Aging-centric genetic health database in California: 100k people, ~65yrs, 700k SNPs, telomeres too

Kaiser Permanente alongside with UCSF plans for genetic analyses of an unprecedented 100,000 older Californians, the Technology Review writes in Massive Gene Database Planned in California The effort will make use of existing saliva samples taken from California patients, whose average age is 65. Their DNA will be analyzed for 700,000 genetic variations called single-nucleotide… Continue reading Aging-centric genetic health database in California: 100k people, ~65yrs, 700k SNPs, telomeres too

Sage Bionetworks Update: building an OA standard for human disease biology

Sage Bionetworks is a not-for-profit organization developing an open-access “pre-competitive” platform for networked and annotated models of human disease. It’s a huge and unparalleled bioinformatics enterprise: starting with an anonymous $5 million donation and soon making high throughput, large-scale human and mouse biological data (largely from Merck) available in the range that’s already in the… Continue reading Sage Bionetworks Update: building an OA standard for human disease biology

Bright cells, big city: Cellular images hit Broadway

Surprise email from Conor McKechnie, GE Healthcare proving the aesthetics of science and the value of blogging: A while (!) back you posted an inspiring piece linking to Harvard’s BioVisions inner life of the cell – it was 2006…It got me thinking that we could do something similarly inspiring with actual cellular images entered into… Continue reading Bright cells, big city: Cellular images hit Broadway

Who’s first? Happy First Birthday, commercial personal genomics!

What do you think, which company launched the first commercial and comprehensive personal genome service (based on a genome-wide SNP scan) on the market and exactly when? We have 2 candidates here in the ring deCODE Genetics (founded in 1996, Iceland) and 23andMe (founded in 2006, USA), the Amundsen and Scott of personal genomics. (please… Continue reading Who’s first? Happy First Birthday, commercial personal genomics!