1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

The first Euro Maker Faire in Brussels was an evening event but now with the first UK Maker Faire makers have a chance to hang around for 2 days and develop or deepen their DIY skills similar to the original US events (we enjoyed Austin Maker Faire in 2007). Let me know if you’re interested.… Continue reading 1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

Nature’s newest issue has a Quantitative genetics supplement with 3 free access pieces included out which I find this review the most interesting: Reverse engineering the genotype–phenotype map with natural genetic variation by Matthew V. Rockman. There’s a lot information to digest and many patterns to understand in this background field in order to approach… Continue reading Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

“blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

A new, completely rewritten, integrated nature.com website blogs.nature.com has been launched by the Natureplex people – informed his Twitter pals Euan Adie: Also, blogs.nature.com v1 is live! Tequila and donuts all round. Early n’ often release v2 coming on the 18th so get any bug reports in now. Suggest good science blogs that are not… Continue reading “blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Looks like this August is the center of my science related social life in 2008: starting with the bottom-up BioBarCamp unconference in Palo Alto followed by the top-down Sci Foo Camp unconference in Mountain View and now The Science Blogging Conference in London on the 30th. This conference is an interesting mix: on one hand… Continue reading Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

The marketing problem of life extension technologies

If “Science has a really serious marketing problem” as Larry Page observed, then life extension technologies face even bigger marketing problems. I am definitely not a marketing expert but realized the problem early on when thinking about the lag-phase period of a robust life extension technology.  So I made a short email interview with Dave… Continue reading The marketing problem of life extension technologies

The Biogerontology Research Foundation receives charitable status, UK

Just landed in my mailbox, emphasis added by me: Dear Attila, I would like to provide you with a copy of the press release to be distributed via press release distribution sites on Wednesday. We will also put it on our site within a few hours after this email so you can confirm its authenticity.… Continue reading The Biogerontology Research Foundation receives charitable status, UK

Partial immortalisation goes mainstream with an ‘s’ – thanks to the Economist!

The Economist print edition (Jan 3rd) has a summary article on the current healthy and scientific life extension scene starting with Aubrey De Grey’s engineering, umbrella SENS approach and talking about anti-oxidants, mitochondria, sirtuin activators and stem cell based regenerative medicine amongst others. To my positive surprise the unknown writer of the article (do you… Continue reading Partial immortalisation goes mainstream with an ‘s’ – thanks to the Economist!

Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Finally the Google PageRank algorithm, the core analysis tool of the current web is back to where its idea is originated from, scientific citation analysis. The recently launched SCImago Journal & Country Rank database uses an algorithm very similar to PageRank. It has a new metric: the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). According to Nature: A… Continue reading Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Matt Thurling on the concept of science.TV

Another comment turns to blog post to make it more visible: Following my post on science.TV, Matt Thurling, founder explained the concept of it in a lengthy comment, that sheds light on the ins and outs of science.TV (emphasis added by me): Although science.tv has been some three years in the making, we’re still in… Continue reading Matt Thurling on the concept of science.TV

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

I met Maxine online first when she commented my post on the The problem of online “supporting information” in peer-review articles and then interviewed her on Nature policies concerning the same problem. Then I met Maxine offline in London and learnt a lot on how every issue of Nature is born and other insights I… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Even those scientists, who don’t have any journalism, or out of niche discipline interests (the vast majority), would be eager to take a closer look at how Nature, the number one scientific weekly journal is made, how the articles are peer reviewed, how the column structure looks like, what are the future perspectives of Nature… Continue reading Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Michael Rose, evolutionary SENS and aging as a loss of adaptation (slides)

Embedded on the slideshow below 9 slides of Michael Rose‘s presentation called Slowing and then stopping aging on the SENS3 conference on the 9th of September. (Photos made by me with the iPhone.) Rose’s argument was: Aubrey de Grey’s original SENS proposal is based on the non-evolutionary assumption that aging is a process of accumulating… Continue reading Michael Rose, evolutionary SENS and aging as a loss of adaptation (slides)

Ray Kurzweil’s distance talk on SENS3

Well, I’ve lost the first part of this MacBook made iSight video as I used the iMovie file’s backup version on my Windows partition but out of this segment of the talk you can form some idea on what was going on during Kurzweil’s talk. The distance talk was orchestrated from a little Sony laptop… Continue reading Ray Kurzweil’s distance talk on SENS3

Going to another unconventional science meeting: SENS3, Cambridge, UK

I am visiting the third Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS3) conference, which will be held from 6-10 September 2007 at Queens’ College, Cambridge. Aubrey de Grey (with whom I made a blogterview in 2006), the main organizer and soul behind the conference is clear about the purpose: “The purpose of the SENS conference series,… Continue reading Going to another unconventional science meeting: SENS3, Cambridge, UK

Everyone ‘should donate organs’ post mortem, UK chief medical fellow says

This suggestion sounds like a proper body recycling to me: Everyone should be seen as a potential organ donor on their death unless they expressly request not to be, England’s chief medical officer says. Sir Liam Donaldson calls for a system of “presumed consent” to be introduced to tackle chronic shortages of organs. Only 20%… Continue reading Everyone ‘should donate organs’ post mortem, UK chief medical fellow says

Off-the-shelf skin replacements are on their way…

UK scientists in artificial skin breakthrough: “A long-lasting artificial skin has been developed by British researchers. The Cambridge-based Intercytex Group Plc has announced that tests had produced promising results in healing wounds in early clinical trials…. ICX-SKN is created from a matrix produced by the same skin cells that are responsible for synthesising new tissue… Continue reading Off-the-shelf skin replacements are on their way…

Aubrey de Grey’s Google TechTalk on Prospects for extending healthy life – a lot

Aubrey de Grey‘s presentation in Google Tech Talk series at the Googleplex, Mountain View, May 29, 2007 (Thanks, Russell Whitaker). More on Aubrey on Pimm: Content of Ending Aging, Aubrey de Grey’s coming life extension book 3 Edmonton Aging (Life Extension) Symposium videos Blogterview with Aubrey de Grey: life extension stories

Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

In the age of compelling technology analogies and nomenclatures it was unavoidable that somebody at last identifies enough differences in the history of industrial regenerative medicine to tell Regenerative Medicine 1.0 from 2.0. The man behind is Chris Mason, Group Leader of Stem Cell + Regenerative Medicine Bioprocessing Unit, University College London and cofounder and… Continue reading Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

Virgin’s Branson and stem cell banking

BBC News: “Virgin founder Richard Branson is set to launch a company which will let families bank and store stem cells from their child’s umbilical cord.” Question: Why just umbilical cord blood cells, why not amniotic fluid derived stem cells, or amniotic placental stem cells which have a far more wider regenerative potential than cord… Continue reading Virgin’s Branson and stem cell banking

Cambridge Embryonic Stem Cell Symposium promoted by Nature

18-19, December, Babbage Lecture Theatre, Cambridge: Opening Symposium including “A celebration of 25 years of embryonic stem cell research in Cambridge” From the intro: In 1981 two papers appeared that reported the derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from cultured mouse embryos (1, 2). Now called embryonic stem (ES) cells, they have since transformed research… Continue reading Cambridge Embryonic Stem Cell Symposium promoted by Nature

London Regenerative Medicine Network Meeting, 13th Dec., King’s College

spacetime coordinates: 6.00 pm Wednesday 13th December 2006, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital Campus at London Bridge, London SE1. REGISTRATION IS FREE. Link (funny, Apple-type site) AGENDA: 18.00 – Registration + networking over tea and coffee 18.30 – Welcome – Dr. Stephen Minger (KCL) – Co-organiser – LRMN 18.35 – “Retinal repair by transplantation of… Continue reading London Regenerative Medicine Network Meeting, 13th Dec., King’s College

Be fast, discover: the Watson-Crick paradigm (weekend session)

I tried to explain to my girlfriend the historical recipe of discovering the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick in 3 shots. Place: in front of the blue paque outside Eagle Pub near old Cavendish, Cambridge, UK. (For me, iMovie is not as intuitive without the Help, which explains the poor quality.) From the… Continue reading Be fast, discover: the Watson-Crick paradigm (weekend session)

Mark Hamalainen, the MitoSENS fellow: blogterview on life extension

Mark Hamalainen is a young PhD student at Cambridge University at the mitochondrion lab of Ian Holt. Mark received a Bachelor of Science Honours degree in biochemistry and computing from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He also had research training as a visiting scholar at the California Institute of Technology and the Biodesign Institute at… Continue reading Mark Hamalainen, the MitoSENS fellow: blogterview on life extension

The (all)mighty condrion: Mitochondrial biology, new perspectives, meeting in London

I am happy to participate: The Novartis Foundation in collaboration with The Royal Society of Medicine and The Physiological Society will be holding a one-day meeting on the above subject at Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1 on Friday 1 December 2006. The field of mitochondrial research has undergone a complete re-evaluation in recent… Continue reading The (all)mighty condrion: Mitochondrial biology, new perspectives, meeting in London

Life extension interviews: Nick Bostrom and the philosopher’s point of view

Nick Bostrom is an analytic philosopher by profession in Oxford, but he has a strong background in science too. He is also the co-founder and current chair of the World Transhumanist Association. 1. What is the story of your life extension commitment? I did not think much about the topic until I learned about various… Continue reading Life extension interviews: Nick Bostrom and the philosopher’s point of view

John Cumbers’ DIY approach to life extension: personal genomics and synthetic biology

John Cumbers made the Drosophila CHiP protocol video. He is a graduate student at the Tatar lab in Brown University, USA. Below are his answers to the blogterview questions and through answer 5 you can take a fresh look at the bottom-up approach of synthetic biology.

Blogterview with Aubrey de Grey: life extension stories

Aubrey de Grey is the man, who first made serious, scientifically conceptualized life extension speech acceptable within scholarly circles through good timing, well-done strategy and with a little bit of luck. The rest is … (I’ve slightly modified the original question 4 and separated questions concerning the probable technologies of moderate and maximum life extension.)… Continue reading Blogterview with Aubrey de Grey: life extension stories

$2.9 million NIH Quantum Grant for Neuro-Vascular Regeneration to help stroke patients

For the first time Quantum Grant goes for international research initiative to regenerate damaged brain cells and blood vessels for the treatment of stroke which occurs when an artery in the brain is blocked. The three-year, $2.9 million grant, funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), part of the NIH, will… Continue reading $2.9 million NIH Quantum Grant for Neuro-Vascular Regeneration to help stroke patients

Coating heart stents with human stem cells.

A stent is a small metal coil, slotted tube, or mesh structure that is placed in a coronary artery to keep it open and wide allowing more blood through. It is a permanent implant and the most common intervention for Coronary Artery Disease. From Yorkshire Post Today: Scientists from Sheffield University are developing the world’s… Continue reading Coating heart stents with human stem cells.

Tony Blair: if America does not want stem-cell research – we do

From BRITISH Prime Minister Tony Blair’s last speech as Labour leader at the party’s annual conference: How to be the world’s number one place of choice for bio-science – if America does not want stem-cell research – we do. …The Google generation has moved beyond the idea of 9 to 5, closed on weekends and… Continue reading Tony Blair: if America does not want stem-cell research – we do