SENS3 conference videos online on a personal website

Similarly to the Edmonton Aging Symposium which reportedly “was a WORLD FIRST! in being streamed live onto the internet” (Kevin Perrott) amongst conferences, a selection of the presentations of the SENS3 conference are now available at the personal website of Richard Schueler. Richard is a big mouthed, cowboy hat geek with a serious life extension… Continue reading SENS3 conference videos online on a personal website

Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

Google’s Palimpsest project, once realized (in the near future) has the potential to change the way science is done by accepting gigantic (raw?) data sets from all disciplines and making them open and free (including dark data?). Jon Trowbridge from Google Inc. had a presentation on SciFoo, 2007 at the Googleplex not documented well, but… Continue reading Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

The last time you saw a science presentation with an overhead projector

For me, it was on SENS3, the presentation of Anun Hallen, who blamed only extracellular crosslinks (e.g. advanced glycation end products) for ageing. It was not the best presentation I’ve ever seen, I can tell ya. (I heard once, that there was a high school science contest in the 80’s with an overhead projector only… Continue reading The last time you saw a science presentation with an overhead projector

SENS3: Stephen Coles on the secrets of supercentenarians (slides)

A supercentenarian is anyone with the chronological age of 110 years or older. Stephen Coles, M.D., Ph.D., co-founder of the Los Angeles Gerontology Research Group kindly sent me his slides of the presentation he held last week on SENS3 entitled the Secrets of the oldest old and he gave a permission to publish these slides… Continue reading SENS3: Stephen Coles on the secrets of supercentenarians (slides)

Pecha Kucha for scientists? I’d love to participate

Pecha Kucha Night was invented four years ago by 2 architects, Mark Dytham and Astrid Klein, in Tokyo. During the event each presenter is allowed 20 slides each shown for 20 seconds each giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up. According to Wired journalist Daniel H. Pink: The result,… Continue reading Pecha Kucha for scientists? I’d love to participate

SciVee: scientists with faces and complicated stories to share

SciVee is a new multimedia and community site where scientists can “a., upload a video and synchronize it to their paper b., publish it as a podcast c., create a professional profile and join science groups”. So SciVee is a way for scientists to “communicate their work as a multimedia presentation incorporated with the content… Continue reading SciVee: scientists with faces and complicated stories to share