Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

The newest Nature issue concentrates on personal genomics and its consequences via many types of articles some of them with free access. I only read 1 piece so far by Erika Check Hayden, who has the exclusive freedom at Nature to always pick the best stories and write on any of them, but being a… Continue reading Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

For your free information (FYFI): it’s Open Access Day!

October 14, 2008 is the world’s first Open Access Day and OA itself means free online access to peer-reviewed research articles. Although we have other, slower methods, like personal homepages, emails to authors, institutional repositories to get the same article we were unable to get via closed access journals, OA is the internet-savvy solution that… Continue reading For your free information (FYFI): it’s Open Access Day!

Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Looks like this August is the center of my science related social life in 2008: starting with the bottom-up BioBarCamp unconference in Palo Alto followed by the top-down Sci Foo Camp unconference in Mountain View and now The Science Blogging Conference in London on the 30th. This conference is an interesting mix: on one hand… Continue reading Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

I always had the feeling that the Natureplex (the web division of the Nature Publishing Group headed by Timo Hannay) is ahead of most scientific journal publishing conglomerate’s similar departments. Now with the help of a new Google Trends layer that compares websites in terms of traffic this impression was confirmed again without strict numbers.… Continue reading Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

Meet Dr. Google Health: Roni Zeiger, right out of Stanford!

Roni F. Zeiger, MD (watch his presentation), Google Health product manager, whose PubMed profile (if he really is the very same person) gives us a very strong reason why he was hired by Google for this job (he joined Google in 2006). The 38-year-old, who still sees patients some evenings and weekends at a nearby… Continue reading Meet Dr. Google Health: Roni Zeiger, right out of Stanford!

PITTCON, 2008: bioDIY questions, RFVials, and Science’s new web hirings

As a local New Orleans face (my colleagues just call me Mitoman in the lab) I had the chance to just simply walk into the grandiose PITTCON exhibiton at the Ernest N Morial Convention Center‎ and I liked it. In addition to getting answers to some strictly lab related questions concerning filters and fuges (nevermind),… Continue reading PITTCON, 2008: bioDIY questions, RFVials, and Science’s new web hirings

Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

IT people are the dominant high tech tribe today and especially on the web. But biotechnology (BT) is the next infotech so no wonder that the IT crowd is growingly curious about everything biotagged on the one hand, while they are usually not too savvy in DNA-RNA-protein-organelle-cell-tissue-organ-organism related matters on the other hand. Check for… Continue reading Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

New JoVE helps old Wiley to publish video articles on Current Protocols

A partnership between the Journal of Visualized Experiments and big science publisher Wiley-Blackwell: the JoVE guys will give the technology, the art of making video experiments and Wiley provides the established network, audience on its Current Protocols site. I wonder what will be the access status of those videos: current JoVE videos are freely available,… Continue reading New JoVE helps old Wiley to publish video articles on Current Protocols

‘The horror of closed-access publishing’ according to Jonathan Eisen

Jonathan Eisen is the new Academic Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Biology and wants to build a world in which Open Access and “top tier” can go hand-in-hand: So I accepted the invitation and became an Academic Editor. But I confess that I was not yet a true convert to OA or to PLoS Biology. So I… Continue reading ‘The horror of closed-access publishing’ according to Jonathan Eisen

Nature’s Great Beyond on the Warda-Han-Proteomics-Creator paper

Peer review, ‘a mighty creator’ and an almighty row However the paper was only retracted for “a substantial overlap of the content of this article with previously published articles in other journals.”, not for the strange “mighty creator” line. Peer review isn’t perfect but you’d hope it would catch something like this.

Warda speaks: “We say the truth, I not burrow any sentences from others.”

The Warda-Han-Proteomics saga continues and finds its way to the show/entertainment business. We’ve already listened to Han, now it’s time for Warda to speak, which he did in an email to James Randerson over at the Guardian Science blog, which makes think (indeed ‘rethink’ as W suggests) that the Warda-Han pair is probably the Laurel… Continue reading Warda speaks: “We say the truth, I not burrow any sentences from others.”

The Warda-Han-Proteomics scandal: fingerprints of plagiarism, too

We have now a well-developed and sad case example of irresponsible scientific editing and publishing: the Warda-Han advanced online paper by the academic journal Proteomics: Mitochondria, the missing link between body and soul: Proteomic prospective evidence. What started as an abstract-based hunch and question about the quality of a recent review, addressed to and amplified… Continue reading The Warda-Han-Proteomics scandal: fingerprints of plagiarism, too

The fingerprints of a mighty creator in Proteomics, impact factor >5

Creationism/intelligent design is not really an issue for me as I am a biologist working with mitochondria and stem cells, also a life extension supporter, whose angle on things and projections are based on the recent advancements in science and technology. As far as I know, creationism/ID neither suggests any new experiments or heuristic solutions… Continue reading The fingerprints of a mighty creator in Proteomics, impact factor >5

Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Finally the Google PageRank algorithm, the core analysis tool of the current web is back to where its idea is originated from, scientific citation analysis. The recently launched SCImago Journal & Country Rank database uses an algorithm very similar to PageRank. It has a new metric: the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). According to Nature: A… Continue reading Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

CNN, USA Today and the terraniche media on niche science video sites

What do you think about the distinction of mainstream – niche on the web? Isn’t it the case that ‘mainstream media’ is just a niche after all, and not necessarily the most important? We have a very nice case study now on how ideas, memes, actions, movements in the science/tech arena are spreading throughout the… Continue reading CNN, USA Today and the terraniche media on niche science video sites

Unofficial and hypercritical peer review of a paper on p53’s role in hESC regulation

Once I wrote shortly about the following peer review paper which was popped out of my PubMed feeds to draw some attention to it: Han Qin, Tianxin Yu, Tingting Qing, Yanxia Liu, Yang Zhao, Jun Cai, Jian Li, Zhihua Song, Xiuxia Qu, Peng Zhou, Jiong Wu, Mingxiao Ding, Hongkui Deng Regulation of apoptosis and differentiation… Continue reading Unofficial and hypercritical peer review of a paper on p53’s role in hESC regulation

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

I met Maxine online first when she commented my post on the The problem of online “supporting information” in peer-review articles and then interviewed her on Nature policies concerning the same problem. Then I met Maxine offline in London and learnt a lot on how every issue of Nature is born and other insights I… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Alien vs. Predator like stupid question for the weekend: Which do you think is the best source when it is about interesting and quality science content: the Techmeme clone Blogrunner (here it’s the science channel of Blogrunner), that is the newly launched automated online news service and blogs aggregator by the New York Times or… Continue reading Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

BioMed Search relaunched

BioMed Search, the Google-like BioMedical Image Search Engine is alive after a long off period as it was relaunched about 1 month ago. Current informal science communication in the lab (say in lab meetings or in journal clubs) is centered around interpreting figures. BioMed Search catches somehow the essence of this communication with indexing the… Continue reading BioMed Search relaunched

Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Disciplinary science has a rather short-term memory (see the reference section of peer review articles) while science publishing is relying on the long-term version, especially if it is the journal Nature, published first in 1869. Now they launched an innovative new site dedicated solely to the history of the journal, full with multimedia snippets and… Continue reading Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Unpublished SENS3 conference report for mainstream scientists!

Recently I wrote a meeting report on the SENS3 conference for a very prestigious science journal, but finally it did not go through the filters. I knew that the chance for publication is small as the journal rarely publish such meeting reports and as it was in many respects an unconventional science conference. The standards… Continue reading Unpublished SENS3 conference report for mainstream scientists!

The Open Aging Journal wants you to submit articles!

My gmailbox says and I see no reason not to share it: The Open Aging Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews and letters in all areas of aging science. The journal aims to provide the most complete and reliable source of information on current developments in the field. The… Continue reading The Open Aging Journal wants you to submit articles!

Wired on the emerging science video websites: see one, do one, teach one

Wired has a nice piece on Video Sites Help Scientists Show Instead of Tell by Alexis Madrigal focusing on the high-end, non-youtubish, let’s-build-the-pro-network-of-video-geeks-in-the-labs-out-there approach of JoVE. Video players mentioned on the pop side: LabAction and PloS backed SciVee. The real question of this niche market is: In order to penetrate the mainstream science audience what… Continue reading Wired on the emerging science video websites: see one, do one, teach one

Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Even those scientists, who don’t have any journalism, or out of niche discipline interests (the vast majority), would be eager to take a closer look at how Nature, the number one scientific weekly journal is made, how the articles are peer reviewed, how the column structure looks like, what are the future perspectives of Nature… Continue reading Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Freeing dark, negative research data is the next in open access science?

Positive, published scientific data form the tip of the iceberg of any scientific data produced in labs. As at least 90% (my guess) of all experiments are failed or lead to negative results, those data sets become “dark data“. But those dark data are as important for making science happen as positive data and this… Continue reading Freeing dark, negative research data is the next in open access science?

Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

At The Scientist, the editors are awaiting your suggestions on your favorite life science blogs to gather the list of blogs that are especially hot for life science researchers. They asked 7 science bloggers, 5 from ScienceBlogs by SEED (Abel Pharmboy, Bora Zivkovic, Carl Zimmer, Newamul Khan, PZ Myers) and 2 independent bloggers (Ed Silverman… Continue reading Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

If you compare the Nature and the Science front pages (which is not the topic of the current post) you can notice a big difference: there are a lot of “web 2.0″ish fresh features on the Nature site while significantly fewer on the Science counterpart. Now Science came up with a new, less academic and… Continue reading The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

The edited version of Pimm’s January 30th, 2007 post How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds? was published in The Summer 2007 issue of Nurture, the magazine for past and present Nature journal authors. According to Maxine Clarke, Nurture editor: The Summer 2007 Issue of Nurture celebrates our blossoming “science 2.0” activities,… Continue reading Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

Maxine Clarke over at Nature’s Nautilus blog published Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads. July was a particularly strong month for Nature concerning pluripotency and embryonic stem cells as 5 out of the 10 top ten downloads, that is 50% of the most popular articles are tinkering with stem cell biology. The other trend: microRNAs,… Continue reading Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Let’s give a chance to audio articles, a new initiative being trialed by Nature Clinical Practice. “These are FREE full-text audio versions of printed content from the March 2007 issue of Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology. The aim of the Nature Clinical Practice journals is ‘to translate the latest findings into clinical practice’ by highlighting important… Continue reading Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

SciFoo is over, and I’ve just arrived back to New Orleans from SF. First of all: a big thanks for the organizers (Chris DiBona, Timo Hannay, Tim O’Reilly, Google, Nature, O’Reilly) and campers, it was really the highest end. Here is a quick SciFoo key terms summary (photos, detailed accounts later): “scientific data” One of… Continue reading SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

There are way too much papers and data published in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine to follow and filter with traditional offline, spread of mouth tools. At the Journal Club section of Nature Reports Stem Cells, researchers have the opportunity to highlight and discuss the papers they found of utmost importance… Continue reading Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

I like Google and Apple products, but my expectations are focusing on how these products can help and facilitate me as a scientist, especially as a biomedical research scientist. With the Science on the iPhone test series I’d like to examine in details how proper and user friendly is the iPhone as an ultimate portable,… Continue reading Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

Highlights from Science 6/07 issue: wireless power, education, hippocampus, avatars

It was a long time ago, when I last had the opportunity to scan through a complete printed, offline Science issue. On the picture made by Anna with my iPhone (it is not named yet), I am just going to relax with Science and sync my iPhone. Here are my suggestions to read: Straight Talk… Continue reading Highlights from Science 6/07 issue: wireless power, education, hippocampus, avatars

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Links from my reader/radar: Googlized Science Direct, Foo Camp, G Scholar as impact-o-meter

Science Direct-ly into Google by Peter Brantley, O’Reilly Radar: Elsevier has now undertaken to have the majority of its SD journals (those for which it holds or can obtain the copyrights) crawled and indexed by Google. Both Google and Google Scholar are slowly incorporating an increasing amount of this content, and these data will be… Continue reading Links from my reader/radar: Googlized Science Direct, Foo Camp, G Scholar as impact-o-meter