The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2009: telomere/telomerase, Blackburn, Greider, Szostak

“for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase” press release The award goes to Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak. The problem of telomere/telomerases is highlighting the double but strictly related aging/cancer problem space: Blackburn Lab Greider Lab Szostak Lab

Bright cells, big city: Cellular images hit Broadway

Surprise email from Conor McKechnie, GE Healthcare proving the aesthetics of science and the value of blogging: A while (!) back you posted an inspiring piece linking to Harvard’s BioVisions inner life of the cell – it was 2006…It got me thinking that we could do something similarly inspiring with actual cellular images entered into… Continue reading Bright cells, big city: Cellular images hit Broadway

Who’s first? Happy First Birthday, commercial personal genomics!

What do you think, which company launched the first commercial and comprehensive personal genome service (based on a genome-wide SNP scan) on the market and exactly when? We have 2 candidates here in the ring deCODE Genetics (founded in 1996, Iceland) and 23andMe (founded in 2006, USA), the Amundsen and Scott of personal genomics. (please… Continue reading Who’s first? Happy First Birthday, commercial personal genomics!

Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Looks like this August is the center of my science related social life in 2008: starting with the bottom-up BioBarCamp unconference in Palo Alto followed by the top-down Sci Foo Camp unconference in Mountain View and now The Science Blogging Conference in London on the 30th. This conference is an interesting mix: on one hand… Continue reading Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

UCSF Memory & Aging Center channel on YouTube & ‘Fight for Mike’

Even tech people in Silicon Valley need to join their powerful forces and sources when it is about aging related neurodegenerative diseases and help research and the clinic. UCSF Memory and Aging Center channel on YouTube  Om Malik: A Personal Note: Pause & Read via John Battelle  

‘The horror of closed-access publishing’ according to Jonathan Eisen

Jonathan Eisen is the new Academic Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Biology and wants to build a world in which Open Access and “top tier” can go hand-in-hand: So I accepted the invitation and became an Academic Editor. But I confess that I was not yet a true convert to OA or to PLoS Biology. So I… Continue reading ‘The horror of closed-access publishing’ according to Jonathan Eisen

The New York Times advertises itself with stem cell research

I’ve just noticed a New York Times paid “stem cell research” Google Adwords ad in my gmail inbox besides the automated “Rejuvenation Research Vol. 11, No. 1, Feb 2008 is now available online” mail. That said, The New York Times is ranking the “stem cell” buzzword high and fishes for layman readers interested in the… Continue reading The New York Times advertises itself with stem cell research

We have only winners at the Laboratory Website Awards!

I hope that scientists and IT and financial managers of scientists worldwide will be able to utilize the collective lab website culture and wisdom accumulated by the first ever Laboratory Web Site Awards by The Scientist! And I personally would like to say thank you for the following editors of The Scientist (The Scientists) for… Continue reading We have only winners at the Laboratory Website Awards!

Flourishing lab site culture around the Laboratory Website Awards!

You can still nominate your favorite lab websites at the Laboratory Website and Video Awards or LaWVAs (pronounced like “lava) hosted by The Scientist. (Disclaimer: I am a consultant to The Scientist on the LaWVA project and a member of the judging panel.) I’ve just checked the candidates and they are amazingly versatile ranging from… Continue reading Flourishing lab site culture around the Laboratory Website Awards!

The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Here is a classical web story told in links: a niche blogger got an idea and tries to outsource it, it is popularized by other bloggers, then goes mainstream with the help of a science journal, grows over little blogger’s head and get realized by another powerful science institution. That’s what happened with my unofficial… Continue reading The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Pecha Kucha for scientists? I’d love to participate

Pecha Kucha Night was invented four years ago by 2 architects, Mark Dytham and Astrid Klein, in Tokyo. During the event each presenter is allowed 20 slides each shown for 20 seconds each giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up. According to Wired journalist Daniel H. Pink: The result,… Continue reading Pecha Kucha for scientists? I’d love to participate

Nanodrop video ad from the Brown iGEM team

Imagine a world where grad students and postdocs are well paid by manufacturers and companies by doing ads like the following one. The Brown iGEM Team shows off the Nanodrop Spectrophotometer and compares it to regular spectrophotometers in a funny, easy to catch way. (They were not paid by this.) And how the disclaimers would… Continue reading Nanodrop video ad from the Brown iGEM team

For benchwork scientists, it’s always Christmas time: unpacking kits and gifts

One particular advantage of being an experimental scientist is that you are getting nicely packed gifts all the time as you are constantly ordering the kits and material that you need for you experiments. For instance I’ve just got this cute, childishly designed Micro BCA Protein Assay Kit developed for measuring protein concentration in the… Continue reading For benchwork scientists, it’s always Christmas time: unpacking kits and gifts

Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Let’s give a chance to audio articles, a new initiative being trialed by Nature Clinical Practice. “These are FREE full-text audio versions of printed content from the March 2007 issue of Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology. The aim of the Nature Clinical Practice journals is ‘to translate the latest findings into clinical practice’ by highlighting important… Continue reading Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

There are way too much papers and data published in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine to follow and filter with traditional offline, spread of mouth tools. At the Journal Club section of Nature Reports Stem Cells, researchers have the opportunity to highlight and discuss the papers they found of utmost importance… Continue reading Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

The domesticated biotech future according to Freeman Dyson

Freeman Dyson, old school physics hero conceptualized his rather philosophical thoughts on future biotechnology in a visionary essay in The New York Review of Books, Volume 54, Number 12 · July 19, 2007. What is surprising to me that according to Dyson “our biotech future” is centered around genetic engineering only, and there is not… Continue reading The domesticated biotech future according to Freeman Dyson

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

I’ve just realized how cool is Cell magazine May 4 issue’s cover (the one with the Scientist Enter the Blogosphere report by Laura Bonetta) with the S-nitrosothiol superhero T-shirt. This substance may have some therapeutic utility in diseases such as heart failure and asthma. Illustration: Cell and me this morning. Cartoons are terrific education tools,… Continue reading Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Builders, Hackers, Do-It-Yourselfers are gathering around this weekend at the most visible embodiment of the Maker spirit, the Maker Faire 2007 at San Mateo Fairgrounds, California. I remember the inquisitive and incredulous eyes of the traditional tech makers, coders, engineers while presenting my placental stem cell project at Euro Maker Faire last year. Now imagine… Continue reading Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Stem Cell Lab Monitor: the Bernstein Laboratory at UCSF

The first lab of Pimm’s new series turned out to be the Bernstein Laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco focusing on heart muscle regeneration. Unlike other professors, Harold Bernstein is extra fast, he answered my questions within 8 hours. This web-availability, rare within academic circles, positively correlates with the design and functionality of… Continue reading Stem Cell Lab Monitor: the Bernstein Laboratory at UCSF

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

These two titles are freshly out of my feed readers: B-type natriuretic peptide inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol transfer and steroidogenesis in primary human adrenocortical cells. and In vivo expression of human ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR) using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) serotypes 2 and 8. How user friendly these titles are? Let’s examine me: Theoretically… Continue reading Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

Who wants to host the best laboratory website competition?

We have many candidates now for good laboratory websites due to the post What does a good laboratory homepage look like? Show me at least one! All we need is an organizer, an institution (academies, universities, science publishing groups, research institutes, biotech firms, IT companies, rich science freak private people…) someone who can host this… Continue reading Who wants to host the best laboratory website competition?