For your free information (FYFI): it’s Open Access Day!

October 14, 2008 is the world’s first Open Access Day and OA itself means free online access to peer-reviewed research articles. Although we have other, slower methods, like personal homepages, emails to authors, institutional repositories to get the same article we were unable to get via closed access journals, OA is the internet-savvy solution that… Continue reading For your free information (FYFI): it’s Open Access Day!

Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

I always had the feeling that the Natureplex (the web division of the Nature Publishing Group headed by Timo Hannay) is ahead of most scientific journal publishing conglomerate’s similar departments. Now with the help of a new Google Trends layer that compares websites in terms of traffic this impression was confirmed again without strict numbers.… Continue reading Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

Puzzle: Which Wired article is cited in Nature Biotechnology?

Nature Biotechnology is the (peer review) journal for me: it’s geeky, fresh and it takes into account more than just one point-of-view, that of the scientist-academist’s: technology & business are hand in hands also. (Recommending Nat Biotech makes a niche sense here while recommending Nature, which is actually the only science journal I’m reading issue… Continue reading Puzzle: Which Wired article is cited in Nature Biotechnology?

PITTCON, 2008: bioDIY questions, RFVials, and Science’s new web hirings

As a local New Orleans face (my colleagues just call me Mitoman in the lab) I had the chance to just simply walk into the grandiose PITTCON exhibiton at the Ernest N Morial Convention Center‎ and I liked it. In addition to getting answers to some strictly lab related questions concerning filters and fuges (nevermind),… Continue reading PITTCON, 2008: bioDIY questions, RFVials, and Science’s new web hirings

The Warda-Han-Proteomics scandal: fingerprints of plagiarism, too

We have now a well-developed and sad case example of irresponsible scientific editing and publishing: the Warda-Han advanced online paper by the academic journal Proteomics: Mitochondria, the missing link between body and soul: Proteomic prospective evidence. What started as an abstract-based hunch and question about the quality of a recent review, addressed to and amplified… Continue reading The Warda-Han-Proteomics scandal: fingerprints of plagiarism, too

The fingerprints of a mighty creator in Proteomics, impact factor >5

Creationism/intelligent design is not really an issue for me as I am a biologist working with mitochondria and stem cells, also a life extension supporter, whose angle on things and projections are based on the recent advancements in science and technology. As far as I know, creationism/ID neither suggests any new experiments or heuristic solutions… Continue reading The fingerprints of a mighty creator in Proteomics, impact factor >5

Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Finally the Google PageRank algorithm, the core analysis tool of the current web is back to where its idea is originated from, scientific citation analysis. The recently launched SCImago Journal & Country Rank database uses an algorithm very similar to PageRank. It has a new metric: the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). According to Nature: A… Continue reading Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Let’s vote now for the 10 Finalist Lab Websites at The Scientist!

Ladies and gentlemen of science! You can now rank the 10 finalist websites from 1 to 10 (1 being the best) at the Laboratory Website and Video Awards hosted by The Scientist. Please do not hesitate, judging is a lot of fun and this is a big issue: figuring out the parameters of the labsite… Continue reading Let’s vote now for the 10 Finalist Lab Websites at The Scientist!

Science’s Netwatch: Aging blog in focus

Here is another sign that the editors at Science Magazine are taking more and more attention to the web and the scientific blogosphere: Ouroboros (that is: Chris, Okie and Lev) was picked up in the Random Samples column of the current Science issue: “But research on aging is booming, and the field’s good health is… Continue reading Science’s Netwatch: Aging blog in focus

Flourishing lab site culture around the Laboratory Website Awards!

You can still nominate your favorite lab websites at the Laboratory Website and Video Awards or LaWVAs (pronounced like “lava) hosted by The Scientist. (Disclaimer: I am a consultant to The Scientist on the LaWVA project and a member of the judging panel.) I’ve just checked the candidates and they are amazingly versatile ranging from… Continue reading Flourishing lab site culture around the Laboratory Website Awards!

Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Disciplinary science has a rather short-term memory (see the reference section of peer review articles) while science publishing is relying on the long-term version, especially if it is the journal Nature, published first in 1869. Now they launched an innovative new site dedicated solely to the history of the journal, full with multimedia snippets and… Continue reading Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

As this very site here is embedded in the blog medium, we could and should be experimental and eclectic in our style as we cannot control (just target) our audience, thank the web. Now a report on a science conference could be addressed to very different audiences, and yesterday I showed an example on how… Continue reading Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Here is a classical web story told in links: a niche blogger got an idea and tries to outsource it, it is popularized by other bloggers, then goes mainstream with the help of a science journal, grows over little blogger’s head and get realized by another powerful science institution. That’s what happened with my unofficial… Continue reading The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Biopolis profile and cancer stem cells in current Cell Stem Cell

It is now the 3rd issue of Cell Stem Cell, which is the official journal of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). From the current issue: In human pancreatic cancer a distinct subpopulation of migrating CD133+ CXCR4+ cancer stem cells turned out to be essential for tumor metastasis different from the ones responsible… Continue reading Biopolis profile and cancer stem cells in current Cell Stem Cell

The Open Aging Journal wants you to submit articles!

My gmailbox says and I see no reason not to share it: The Open Aging Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews and letters in all areas of aging science. The journal aims to provide the most complete and reliable source of information on current developments in the field. The… Continue reading The Open Aging Journal wants you to submit articles!

Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Even those scientists, who don’t have any journalism, or out of niche discipline interests (the vast majority), would be eager to take a closer look at how Nature, the number one scientific weekly journal is made, how the articles are peer reviewed, how the column structure looks like, what are the future perspectives of Nature… Continue reading Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

If you compare the Nature and the Science front pages (which is not the topic of the current post) you can notice a big difference: there are a lot of “web 2.0″ish fresh features on the Nature site while significantly fewer on the Science counterpart. Now Science came up with a new, less academic and… Continue reading The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

Maxine Clarke over at Nature’s Nautilus blog published Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads. July was a particularly strong month for Nature concerning pluripotency and embryonic stem cells as 5 out of the 10 top ten downloads, that is 50% of the most popular articles are tinkering with stem cell biology. The other trend: microRNAs,… Continue reading Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Let’s give a chance to audio articles, a new initiative being trialed by Nature Clinical Practice. “These are FREE full-text audio versions of printed content from the March 2007 issue of Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology. The aim of the Nature Clinical Practice journals is ‘to translate the latest findings into clinical practice’ by highlighting important… Continue reading Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

There are way too much papers and data published in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine to follow and filter with traditional offline, spread of mouth tools. At the Journal Club section of Nature Reports Stem Cells, researchers have the opportunity to highlight and discuss the papers they found of utmost importance… Continue reading Make a pro buzz for your favourite stem cell papers at Nature Reports Stem Cells!

Highlights from Science 6/07 issue: wireless power, education, hippocampus, avatars

It was a long time ago, when I last had the opportunity to scan through a complete printed, offline Science issue. On the picture made by Anna with my iPhone (it is not named yet), I am just going to relax with Science and sync my iPhone. Here are my suggestions to read: Straight Talk… Continue reading Highlights from Science 6/07 issue: wireless power, education, hippocampus, avatars

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Links from my reader/radar: Googlized Science Direct, Foo Camp, G Scholar as impact-o-meter

Science Direct-ly into Google by Peter Brantley, O’Reilly Radar: Elsevier has now undertaken to have the majority of its SD journals (those for which it holds or can obtain the copyrights) crawled and indexed by Google. Both Google and Google Scholar are slowly incorporating an increasing amount of this content, and these data will be… Continue reading Links from my reader/radar: Googlized Science Direct, Foo Camp, G Scholar as impact-o-meter

Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

The Natureplex (Nature Web Publishing Department on the second floor of a renovated warehouse with around 25 people near at King’s Cross, London) nerds are still busy: Scintilla, a science recommendation engine was launched based on aggregating science content from RSS/Atom feeds of various websites. How could Scintilla (check what the term scintillation refers to,… Continue reading Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

In my opinion the Google of science publishing is the umbrella brand Nature Publishing Group. The best indicator of it is the growing number of freshly released beta products making NPG web initiatives a heaven for scientific early adopters. As Timo Hannay, web editor of Nature said in an interview in Spiegel: The core business… Continue reading Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

How many fine niche stem cell blogs do you know? 4-3-2-1? How many with an attractive, easy to remember name? 0? Good, short, actual and proper blog names are rare. Let me introduce you The Niche which intends to become THE Stem Cell Blog in the niche of the niches. It is the newest Nature… Continue reading The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

Nature Reports Stem Cells is live from now on…for stem cell enthusiasts

No more waiting: Nature Reports Stem Cells (NRSC) launched today, and so finally there is a fully web native, scientifically high-end (naturally), freely accessible, all-in-one stem cell research hub site for everyone (especially for the researchers) to read, share, contribute and turn the acquired insights back into new experiments, policies, ethics, businesses and clinical trials.… Continue reading Nature Reports Stem Cells is live from now on…for stem cell enthusiasts

Industry and career focused stem cell report in the current Nature volume

Positively tuned (for the most part) report on stem cell science by Ricki Lewis: The hard cell Nature 447, 748-749 (June 2007) Excerpts, emphasis added by me: research in the field is thriving globally. At least 500 companies and collaborations have sprung up, 100 of them in the past year alone… A solid background for… Continue reading Industry and career focused stem cell report in the current Nature volume

Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Wow, I feel fresh air, although I am not sure whether the following news is a beginning of any deeper changes or not: From Science Authors Guideline: “Because of changes Microsoft has made in its recent Word release that are incompatible with our internal workflow, which was built around previous versions of the software, Science… Continue reading Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

OK folks, after reading the official rules about how to get and manage a doctoral thesis, and after speaking with my supervisor asking for his permission, I’ve decided to edit my ongoing doctoral thesis in Pimm. Or at least the introduction of it, which is intended to be no other than a review-like summary of… Continue reading Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

I’ve just realized how cool is Cell magazine May 4 issue’s cover (the one with the Scientist Enter the Blogosphere report by Laura Bonetta) with the S-nitrosothiol superhero T-shirt. This substance may have some therapeutic utility in diseases such as heart failure and asthma. Illustration: Cell and me this morning. Cartoons are terrific education tools,… Continue reading Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists

If you are busy building a professional career and want things to get done, it’s time to forget MySpace, Facebook or any other social networking 1.0 sites, that are focusing on friendship, love, spam whatever with a general membership. What you need is social networking 2.0, which is based on the special profession you’re in,… Continue reading Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists

Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

These two titles are freshly out of my feed readers: B-type natriuretic peptide inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol transfer and steroidogenesis in primary human adrenocortical cells. and In vivo expression of human ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR) using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) serotypes 2 and 8. How user friendly these titles are? Let’s examine me: Theoretically… Continue reading Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

Free Nature Reviews Neuroscience Issue in May

From the Nautilus blog by Maxine Clarke: “Nature Reviews Neuroscience is the no. 1 monthly review journal in neuroscience, with an impact factor of 20.951. In May, online access to the entire issue is free.” I would like to offer these articles which could be of interest for stem cell biologists: Research Highlights Neurogenesis: Single… Continue reading Free Nature Reviews Neuroscience Issue in May

Stories from my PubMed feeds: hESCs, p53, apoptosis and differentiation

Short peer-review storytelling : One big technical problem of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) (in contrast to mouse embryonic stem cells) that hESCs normally undergo high rates of spontaneous apoptosis and differentiation, making them difficult to maintain in culture. Now we are getting to know a bit more on the molecular background of these processes.… Continue reading Stories from my PubMed feeds: hESCs, p53, apoptosis and differentiation

Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site

Maxine Clarke, Publishing Executive Editor of Nature and blogger of Peer-to-Peer got interested in the problem of “supporting information” and in the idea of an open access, peer-review supporting information aggregator website. She shared with me her valuable thoughts and informations by mail, from which I now publish parts with the permission of Maxine Clarke… Continue reading Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site