LavaAmp: cheapest pocket PCR thermocycler dreamed for DIY biologists

The LavaAmp is a portable PCR thermocycler that has the potential to become the default garage biology (home biology, bioDIY, DIYbio) tool once it hits the market. Think of Apple II for personal computing or MakerBot for 3D printing. The 1st LavaAmp prototype was shipped this week from Biodesic to Gahaga Biosciences and the process… Continue reading LavaAmp: cheapest pocket PCR thermocycler dreamed for DIY biologists

Practical DNA: Hugh Rienhoff’s got a story to tell

After the Nature cover article Hugh Rienhoff and the story of My Daughter’s DNA is now covered by Wired magazine. I wrote about Hugh (a fellow SciFoo Camper) as an example of any future bioDIY effort in The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement and now the Wired piece gives us more context and details… Continue reading Practical DNA: Hugh Rienhoff’s got a story to tell

1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

The first Euro Maker Faire in Brussels was an evening event but now with the first UK Maker Faire makers have a chance to hang around for 2 days and develop or deepen their DIY skills similar to the original US events (we enjoyed Austin Maker Faire in 2007). Let me know if you’re interested.… Continue reading 1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

Biotech DIY for aging/life extension research: the double future?

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” – said Alan Kay, computer legend in 1971. Recently I had a comment dialogue with Chris on whether state-supported research or industrial business enterprises can (or should) lead to big progress in robust and healthy life extension technologies. Besides the government and corporation coin… Continue reading Biotech DIY for aging/life extension research: the double future?

The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement

The idea of doing biological experiments with current biotechnological methods and conducting research projects at home is quite new. There are already many names in use referring to the same concept: bioDIY, home biology, biotech DIY, garage biology. We have a detailed case example which can be considered as the first registered, high profile biotech… Continue reading The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement

The official method, the DIY solution and the science hack

Original title, let’s call it subtitle: Can we isolate human cell clone derived colonies with an inoculation loop? The following post is dedicated for scientists who ever faced with a similar problem, that is running out of cloning disks and working late. In experimental science, when people are facing with a problem need to be… Continue reading The official method, the DIY solution and the science hack

Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

The biggest impact of the Austin Maker Faire on me was that yesterday I bought an open source, CC licensed Arduino microcontroller and a breadboard for building prototype electronic circuits. I am a total rookie in home electronics but I thought it’s never too late to learn completely new things with the help of our… Continue reading Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

The edited version of Pimm’s January 30th, 2007 post How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds? was published in The Summer 2007 issue of Nurture, the magazine for past and present Nature journal authors. According to Maxine Clarke, Nurture editor: The Summer 2007 Issue of Nurture celebrates our blossoming “science 2.0” activities,… Continue reading Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

BioTechnique in SF: mixing art with biotech in a DIY era

There must be art times for biotechnologists too! Artists are always interested in the new and strange, and current biotech meets these 2 criteria. I was informed by curator Philip Ross on a coming geeky art event called BioTechnique, which will open this October at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.… Continue reading BioTechnique in SF: mixing art with biotech in a DIY era

Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

I like Google and Apple products, but my expectations are focusing on how these products can help and facilitate me as a scientist, especially as a biomedical research scientist. With the Science on the iPhone test series I’d like to examine in details how proper and user friendly is the iPhone as an ultimate portable,… Continue reading Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

Science Hacker: my Nature Network miniblog

I started Science Hacker (sometimes I rename it to Biotech Geek depending on the post) on Nature Network in May and at the present moment you can find there post excerpts out of Pimm. But I plan to fill it with an original content too and my first de novo post there is: Would you… Continue reading Science Hacker: my Nature Network miniblog

The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

I am really grateful for the echoes in the scientific blogosphere on my live onblogging doctoral thesis trial. (I especially liked PZ Pharyngula Myers’ thesis story which inspired me to put some pictures and texts into Comic Life.) What is crucial here: this way I can perfectly match my professional daily job with my blogging… Continue reading The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

Google as your daily lab organizer or The Google Scientist Gamma

From the Financial Times: Google’s ambition to maximise the personal information it holds on users is so great that the search engine envisages a day when it can tell people what jobs to take and how they might spend their days off. Google CEO Eric Schmidt said: “The goal is to enable Google users to… Continue reading Google as your daily lab organizer or The Google Scientist Gamma

Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Builders, Hackers, Do-It-Yourselfers are gathering around this weekend at the most visible embodiment of the Maker spirit, the Maker Faire 2007 at San Mateo Fairgrounds, California. I remember the inquisitive and incredulous eyes of the traditional tech makers, coders, engineers while presenting my placental stem cell project at Euro Maker Faire last year. Now imagine… Continue reading Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Maxine Clarke, Nature’s blogactive and web-oriented Publishing Executive Editor blogged on has an interesting and opinionated editorial on Share your lab notes in Nature 447, 1-2 (3 May 2007). also available at Nautilus. Her The line of argument is: The use of electronic laboratory notebooks should be supported by all concerned since they “contain data… Continue reading Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site

Maxine Clarke, Publishing Executive Editor of Nature and blogger of Peer-to-Peer got interested in the problem of “supporting information” and in the idea of an open access, peer-review supporting information aggregator website. She shared with me her valuable thoughts and informations by mail, from which I now publish parts with the permission of Maxine Clarke… Continue reading Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site

Let’s make ‘supplementary’ peer-review scientific videos free and youtubish!

In the last post on “supporting information” section I claimed that the problematic status of supporting information comes from the heterogeneity of its data, on the one hand genuine online multimedial files, on the other hand “paperlike” data. Big differences also occur concerning the importance of the data. The source of the heterogeneity is the… Continue reading Let’s make ‘supplementary’ peer-review scientific videos free and youtubish!

How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds?

How many people out of you, life scientists, are regularly updating their PubMed searches through RSS feeds? According to the Read/Write Read Blog 2006 Web Technology Trends “While 2006 can’t be seen as the breakthrough year for RSS in the mainstream, we will probably see RSS bloom in 2007”. It’s January, 2007, so let’s upgrade… Continue reading How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds?

Quantitative stem cell papers on arXiv.org

arXiv.org is the urform of open access scientific publishing since 1992, where “formal peer review is replaced by constant peer interest.” as Quinn Norton wrote. It is is THE preprint server for scientists in physics, maths, for instance, Grisha Perelman’s million dollar proof-sketch was first published here. But did you know that there are many… Continue reading Quantitative stem cell papers on arXiv.org

How to isolate amniotic stem cells from the placenta, at home!

/Thanks for spreading the idea of biotech diy: Make, Pharyngula, kottke.org, Scientific American Blog, BoingBoing, Digital Bio, Clock among others…/ The placenta is a very valuable and scarce human tissue, although the proper recycling of it is not placentophagy, but the isolation of stem cells from its amnion layer, and storing them for later regenerative… Continue reading How to isolate amniotic stem cells from the placenta, at home!