“blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

A new, completely rewritten, integrated nature.com website blogs.nature.com has been launched by the Natureplex people – informed his Twitter pals Euan Adie: Also, blogs.nature.com v1 is live! Tequila and donuts all round. Early n’ often release v2 coming on the 18th so get any bug reports in now. Suggest good science blogs that are not… Continue reading “blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Looks like this August is the center of my science related social life in 2008: starting with the bottom-up BioBarCamp unconference in Palo Alto followed by the top-down Sci Foo Camp unconference in Mountain View and now The Science Blogging Conference in London on the 30th. This conference is an interesting mix: on one hand… Continue reading Science Blogging 2008 in London by Nature Network

Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

IT people are the dominant high tech tribe today and especially on the web. But biotechnology (BT) is the next infotech so no wonder that the IT crowd is growingly curious about everything biotagged on the one hand, while they are usually not too savvy in DNA-RNA-protein-organelle-cell-tissue-organ-organism related matters on the other hand. Check for… Continue reading Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

Nature’s Great Beyond on the Warda-Han-Proteomics-Creator paper

Peer review, ‘a mighty creator’ and an almighty row However the paper was only retracted for “a substantial overlap of the content of this article with previously published articles in other journals.”, not for the strange “mighty creator” line. Peer review isn’t perfect but you’d hope it would catch something like this.

The MitoWheel blog keeps you updated!

MitoWheel is a cool graphical interface of the circular human mitochondrial genome, which helps the user to get familiar with the mito DNA by searching, clicking and tailoring it. I introduced you MitoWheel a week or so ago, but now you can follow the updates on the MitoWheel Blog. On the blog you get first-hand… Continue reading The MitoWheel blog keeps you updated!

Will JoVE’s new science blog service reinvent the genre?

The pioneer biological video publishing site JoVE (covered here many times) will soon launch a blogging platform and a community site. Nikita Bernstein, the main nerd behind JoVE is building the code and the platform – as Anne Kushnir informed me – should hopefully go live in the next couple of weeks. At least that… Continue reading Will JoVE’s new science blog service reinvent the genre?

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

I have to interrupt my 23andMe streaming cause there are more interesting things are goin’ on. Chris Patil of Ouroboros has already been a blogterviewee (Part 1, 2, 3) on Pimm. He then shared his detailed views on aging and life extension technologies, but I always wanted to ask Chris about his approach on blogging… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

I met Maxine online first when she commented my post on the The problem of online “supporting information” in peer-review articles and then interviewed her on Nature policies concerning the same problem. Then I met Maxine offline in London and learnt a lot on how every issue of Nature is born and other insights I… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Deepak Singh?

Actually the idea of asking science bloggers about their style came to my mind reading one email remark of Deepak on the writing style. Deepak is the guy behind business/byte/genes/molecules and he was a Sci Foo camper this year. He is one amongst the few bloggers who are standing at the intersection of science and… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Deepak Singh?

Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Alien vs. Predator like stupid question for the weekend: Which do you think is the best source when it is about interesting and quality science content: the Techmeme clone Blogrunner (here it’s the science channel of Blogrunner), that is the newly launched automated online news service and blogs aggregator by the New York Times or… Continue reading Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Science’s Netwatch: Aging blog in focus

Here is another sign that the editors at Science Magazine are taking more and more attention to the web and the scientific blogosphere: Ouroboros (that is: Chris, Okie and Lev) was picked up in the Random Samples column of the current Science issue: “But research on aging is booming, and the field’s good health is… Continue reading Science’s Netwatch: Aging blog in focus

Greg Block’s Oracy and science as an exercise in humanitarianism

Did you now what oracy means? Never mind. From late September, Oracy is the blog of Tulane grad student and colleague Gregory Block, whom you can catch now just in the middle of finding his blog voice. Topics are focused on rants about science (specially stem cells), Greg’s melancholy music and stories from New Orleans.… Continue reading Greg Block’s Oracy and science as an exercise in humanitarianism

Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

As this very site here is embedded in the blog medium, we could and should be experimental and eclectic in our style as we cannot control (just target) our audience, thank the web. Now a report on a science conference could be addressed to very different audiences, and yesterday I showed an example on how… Continue reading Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Even those scientists, who don’t have any journalism, or out of niche discipline interests (the vast majority), would be eager to take a closer look at how Nature, the number one scientific weekly journal is made, how the articles are peer reviewed, how the column structure looks like, what are the future perspectives of Nature… Continue reading Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

At The Scientist, the editors are awaiting your suggestions on your favorite life science blogs to gather the list of blogs that are especially hot for life science researchers. They asked 7 science bloggers, 5 from ScienceBlogs by SEED (Abel Pharmboy, Bora Zivkovic, Carl Zimmer, Newamul Khan, PZ Myers) and 2 independent bloggers (Ed Silverman… Continue reading Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

Choosing a proper title for the thesis: The physiologic role of stem cells…

In my last “live” thesis post I said that the first steps of building a thesis are: figuring out a unifying concept behind all my experimental work and finding a proper thesis title. During my PhD work I’ve done various stem cell transplantations (local and systemic) into brain, heart, muscle tissues using different stem cell… Continue reading Choosing a proper title for the thesis: The physiologic role of stem cells…

Science Hacker: my Nature Network miniblog

I started Science Hacker (sometimes I rename it to Biotech Geek depending on the post) on Nature Network in May and at the present moment you can find there post excerpts out of Pimm. But I plan to fill it with an original content too and my first de novo post there is: Would you… Continue reading Science Hacker: my Nature Network miniblog

Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

me: Hi Bora, can you send me the Nature piece on the Blogging Anthology? I am not in the Institute and do not have subscription http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v447/n7146/full/447779b.html Sent at 8:58 PM on Wednesday me: cheers 🙂 Bora: No problem. Thanks. me: wait that is some old stuff. Published online: 22 January 2007; | doi:10.1038/news070122-I’ve read that… Continue reading Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

In my opinion the Google of science publishing is the umbrella brand Nature Publishing Group. The best indicator of it is the growing number of freshly released beta products making NPG web initiatives a heaven for scientific early adopters. As Timo Hannay, web editor of Nature said in an interview in Spiegel: The core business… Continue reading Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

How many fine niche stem cell blogs do you know? 4-3-2-1? How many with an attractive, easy to remember name? 0? Good, short, actual and proper blog names are rare. Let me introduce you The Niche which intends to become THE Stem Cell Blog in the niche of the niches. It is the newest Nature… Continue reading The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

I am really grateful for the echoes in the scientific blogosphere on my live onblogging doctoral thesis trial. (I especially liked PZ Pharyngula Myers’ thesis story which inspired me to put some pictures and texts into Comic Life.) What is crucial here: this way I can perfectly match my professional daily job with my blogging… Continue reading The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

What Google Universal Search’s first 30 results know about “biotech blog”

Everyday web users are strongly adapted to a situation in which 99% of their information comes from the first 30 results of a Google Search (the first 3 pages with divine power, if the setting is 10 results/page). And they are strongly believe the results are significant in most cases. Right? So let us check… Continue reading What Google Universal Search’s first 30 results know about “biotech blog”

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Blogxperiment: mitochondrial division, the graphics way

In the blogxperiment series part 1 the question was: What is the best way to summarize peer-review articles for an open web readership and transmit scholarly knowledge and literature? Here is the cartoon way, figure 1. out of the context of The Machines that Divide and Fuse Mitochondria review, written by Suzanne Hoppins, Laura Lackner,… Continue reading Blogxperiment: mitochondrial division, the graphics way

Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

Check out Grailsearch.org, which was started at the end of January and is hosted by software engineer Jim Craig with a deep interest in aging and bioinformatics. Grailsearch is a “community web portal intended for use by biogerontologists, students of biogerontology, software engineers, biochemists or anyone else interested in working towards the search for systems… Continue reading Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

TierneyLab: new science blog hosted by The New York Times

TierneyLab, the science blog of the professional journalist John Tierney was launched one week at January 15 hosted by The New York Times website with this intro: “I’m hoping to follow the scientific method: experiment to see what works and what doesn’t. I want to give you a chance not just to discuss science but… Continue reading TierneyLab: new science blog hosted by The New York Times

Pimm joins to the Week of Science initiative

I accepted to post only on strict science topics on the second week of February, from 5 till 11. You can sign up too. The initiative, which has an own blog, called Just Science were made by 3 Scienceblogs by Seed bloggers, the authors behind Evolgen, Gene Expression and Mixing Memory. Their motivations are partly… Continue reading Pimm joins to the Week of Science initiative

The open lab: science blogging anthology published

It highlights the power of science blogging that from today you can buy a copy ($19.95) or download a pdf ($8.69) of The Open Laboratory: The Best Writing on Science Blogs 2006, edited by one of my favourite Scienceblogs by Seed blogger, Coturnix aka Bora Zivkovic of A Blog Around the Clock. And there is… Continue reading The open lab: science blogging anthology published

Critical Happy Birthday to Scienceblogs by Seed!

Scienceblogs, powered by Seed Magazine, the only real science blogorilla was launched 1 year ago with a good timing. Here is my summary on SB in a wired-tired-expired form: wired: The numbers are terrific, the blog aggregator form is professional, the community is strong, Scienceblogs ‘s aggregated Technorati Rank is 30 (circa 57,629 incoming links… Continue reading Critical Happy Birthday to Scienceblogs by Seed!

The Scientist on JoVE: Video makes the new science stars?

Thoughtful short piece on the new science video experiment site JoVE in The Scientist blog by Brendan Maher: “Videos like this could cut down troubleshooting time considerably. Moreover, there’s a great opportunity to create some new science stars. Who, after all, doesn’t have a running commentary going through their head as they run through the… Continue reading The Scientist on JoVE: Video makes the new science stars?