1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

The first Euro Maker Faire in Brussels was an evening event but now with the first UK Maker Faire makers have a chance to hang around for 2 days and develop or deepen their DIY skills similar to the original US events (we enjoyed Austin Maker Faire in 2007). Let me know if you’re interested.… Continue reading 1st UK Maker Faire, Newcastle, March 2009, makers wanted!

The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Following Matt Cutts’s tweet I am now writing my blog post using the CrossOver Chromium browser which is a Mac and Linux port of the open source Chromium web browser. Google Chrome (Windows-only so far) is built with open source code from Chromium that means I have now a functional Google Chrome clone under Leopard on… Continue reading The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Low budget, high tech: Microfluidics device out of a $50 plotter!

Building and using low budget but high tech devices at home is a main motivation behind hacking. A Harvard Chemistry Research Group now created a microchannel producing device using a Hewlett Packard 7550A Graphics Plotter (see some eBay prices) to perform a diagnostic protein assay with it amongst others. /See my SciFoo microfluidics coverage./ According… Continue reading Low budget, high tech: Microfluidics device out of a $50 plotter!

Warming up to write my thesis on the blog

Not much happened since my announcement on Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?. I went to the U.S. first and started doing research instead of finishing my PhD education. But now I am back in this “getting a PhD” business as in January I passed the prerequisite comprehensive stem… Continue reading Warming up to write my thesis on the blog

The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement

The idea of doing biological experiments with current biotechnological methods and conducting research projects at home is quite new. There are already many names in use referring to the same concept: bioDIY, home biology, biotech DIY, garage biology. We have a detailed case example which can be considered as the first registered, high profile biotech… Continue reading The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement

Biotechies at O’Reilly ETech, March 3 – 6, San Diego

The O’Reilly Emerging Technology Conference (ETech) is on and this year they had a growing number of biotech related sessions. Fellow SciFoo Campers like Hugh Rienhoff and Timo Hannay, Makers like Phil Torrone and Limor Fried, Brain Hackers like Ed Boyden are visiting and many more.

Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

IT people are the dominant high tech tribe today and especially on the web. But biotechnology (BT) is the next infotech so no wonder that the IT crowd is growingly curious about everything biotagged on the one hand, while they are usually not too savvy in DNA-RNA-protein-organelle-cell-tissue-organ-organism related matters on the other hand. Check for… Continue reading Let’s compile a Biotech for IT folks book and publish it!

My Arduino and home electronics starter kit

After a hard experimental week (I have now around 55 T-75 or T-175 flasks with 6 different growing cell lines in the incubator) finally I have been able to turn a little weekend attention to move a step further with my home electronics “maker” plan. Instead of buying a complete Arduino starter pack ($65) I’ve… Continue reading My Arduino and home electronics starter kit

Thoughts on Open Source Hardware at the Austin Maker Faire

For open source hardware you need open source software and a modular hardware design that makes building customized hardware just as easy as writing software or web apps. In order to make the idea mainstream you need to commercialize it and that’s what exactly Bug Labs is planning to do. (Again, my bioDIY brain says,… Continue reading Thoughts on Open Source Hardware at the Austin Maker Faire

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Choosing a proper title for the thesis: The physiologic role of stem cells…

In my last “live” thesis post I said that the first steps of building a thesis are: figuring out a unifying concept behind all my experimental work and finding a proper thesis title. During my PhD work I’ve done various stem cell transplantations (local and systemic) into brain, heart, muscle tissues using different stem cell… Continue reading Choosing a proper title for the thesis: The physiologic role of stem cells…

Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

me: Hi Bora, can you send me the Nature piece on the Blogging Anthology? I am not in the Institute and do not have subscription http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v447/n7146/full/447779b.html Sent at 8:58 PM on Wednesday me: cheers 🙂 Bora: No problem. Thanks. me: wait that is some old stuff. Published online: 22 January 2007; | doi:10.1038/news070122-I’ve read that… Continue reading Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

I am really grateful for the echoes in the scientific blogosphere on my live onblogging doctoral thesis trial. (I especially liked PZ Pharyngula Myers’ thesis story which inspired me to put some pictures and texts into Comic Life.) What is crucial here: this way I can perfectly match my professional daily job with my blogging… Continue reading The “live”, thesis building blogxperiment: progress through little steps

Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Wow, I feel fresh air, although I am not sure whether the following news is a beginning of any deeper changes or not: From Science Authors Guideline: “Because of changes Microsoft has made in its recent Word release that are incompatible with our internal workflow, which was built around previous versions of the software, Science… Continue reading Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

OK folks, after reading the official rules about how to get and manage a doctoral thesis, and after speaking with my supervisor asking for his permission, I’ve decided to edit my ongoing doctoral thesis in Pimm. Or at least the introduction of it, which is intended to be no other than a review-like summary of… Continue reading Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

Let’s make ‘supplementary’ peer-review scientific videos free and youtubish!

In the last post on “supporting information” section I claimed that the problematic status of supporting information comes from the heterogeneity of its data, on the one hand genuine online multimedial files, on the other hand “paperlike” data. Big differences also occur concerning the importance of the data. The source of the heterogeneity is the… Continue reading Let’s make ‘supplementary’ peer-review scientific videos free and youtubish!

Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

The Best of Technology Writing 2007 will be published by digitalculturebooks with the guest editor Steven Levy. So they are “asking readers to nominate their favorite tech-oriented articles, essays, and blog posts from 2006. The competition is open to any and every technology topic–biotech, information technology, gadgetry, tech policy, Silicon Valley, and software engineering are… Continue reading Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

Smart comments on the home placenta stem cell project

I collected some critical comments worth considering on the home placenta stem cell project from Make readers. Thanks for all. “Um hello..how many people have a whole lab set up in their home?”20+ years ago — that sentiment would be — “How many people can afford a whole computing set up in their home? (and… Continue reading Smart comments on the home placenta stem cell project

What is bioDIY?

I republish here my “manifesto” like article on biotech DIY, which I wrote in April, 2006 on Newsvine in order to see the thoughts behind the placenta stem cell project. Would you like to sequence your genome in your garage? To grow your stem cells in the kitchen-lab? To hunt for point mutations just for… Continue reading What is bioDIY?

How to isolate amniotic stem cells from the placenta, at home!

/Thanks for spreading the idea of biotech diy: Make, Pharyngula, kottke.org, Scientific American Blog, BoingBoing, Digital Bio, Clock among others…/ The placenta is a very valuable and scarce human tissue, although the proper recycling of it is not placentophagy, but the isolation of stem cells from its amnion layer, and storing them for later regenerative… Continue reading How to isolate amniotic stem cells from the placenta, at home!

How would you define the regenerative potential of a tissue/organ?

Dear stem cell biologists and bioinformaticians: I’ve got a pretty serious question for you. How would you define and quantify the native (endogeneous, in-built) regenerative potential of a tissue/organ or more generally of a specially localized functional cell population in the human body? In the literature the term “regenerative potential” of a tissue is often… Continue reading How would you define the regenerative potential of a tissue/organ?

The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

Check out the brand new BioMed Search, it is fantastic, currently over 1 million images have been indexed from peer-review journals in biomedical fields and more is on its way. BioMed Search has been created by Alex Ksikes, currently a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science with focus in Computational Learning Theory at the University of… Continue reading The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

JoVE stats: blogosphere and Nature News traffic before official launch

The first official issue of the new biological video protocol site JoVE or Journal of Visualized Experiments will be available today 11 pm EST, November 30, 2006. The graph shows November traffic in term of unique visitors, first 2.5 weeks mainly uploaders, authors, editors and editors’ friends used the page, from 17th there was a… Continue reading JoVE stats: blogosphere and Nature News traffic before official launch

Nature News on JoVE: is JoVE really the YouTube for life scientists?

Nature News has an article of the new Journal of Visual Experiments website, whereof Pimm had a story one week ago with the help of Moshe Pritsker, founder of the site. The title of the Nature News post: YouTube for test tubes, which sounds good really, but is problematic a little bit. In a way… Continue reading Nature News on JoVE: is JoVE really the YouTube for life scientists?

Biological Video Protocols on JoVE: Online Journal of Visualized Experiments

At last there is an almost perfect solution for life scientists to share video protocols and insider tricks to learn techniques and repeat experiments properly. Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is a newly founded and FREE online research journal that publishes video-articles on biological experiments (video-protocols). It is an independent project by 2 people, Moshe… Continue reading Biological Video Protocols on JoVE: Online Journal of Visualized Experiments

John Cumbers’ DIY approach to life extension: personal genomics and synthetic biology

John Cumbers made the Drosophila CHiP protocol video. He is a graduate student at the Tatar lab in Brown University, USA. Below are his answers to the blogterview questions and through answer 5 you can take a fresh look at the bottom-up approach of synthetic biology.

Early science protocol video: OpenWetWare Drosophila CHiP

One previous post of Pimm was about the advantages of online, open source-like science protocol videos. So thanks to Sri Kosuri, here is an early sample protocol movie (3 parts) made by John Cumbers on the preparation of fixed chromatin from Drosophila embryos to use the DNA in a genomic array technology, developed in Rob… Continue reading Early science protocol video: OpenWetWare Drosophila CHiP