“blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

A new, completely rewritten, integrated nature.com website blogs.nature.com has been launched by the Natureplex people – informed his Twitter pals Euan Adie: Also, blogs.nature.com v1 is live! Tequila and donuts all round. Early n’ often release v2 coming on the 18th so get any bug reports in now. Suggest good science blogs that are not… Continue reading “blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

Life extension people & session at SciFoo 2008, Googleplex!

Last year I was probably the only SciFoo Camper with an explicit life extension commitment. I suggested & held a session which was related a bit to partial immortalization but was rather about the systems biology perspective in general, illustrated with some examples. So throughout the terrific SciFoo Camp 2007 life extension as a conversation… Continue reading Life extension people & session at SciFoo 2008, Googleplex!

Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

I always had the feeling that the Natureplex (the web division of the Nature Publishing Group headed by Timo Hannay) is ahead of most scientific journal publishing conglomerate’s similar departments. Now with the help of a new Google Trends layer that compares websites in terms of traffic this impression was confirmed again without strict numbers.… Continue reading Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

Nature Network’s first birthday!

Nature Network is 1 year old! A good retrospective summary by Matt Brown and Corie Lok: Happy Birthday Nature Network Also check Maxine Clarke’s snapshot on NN over at Nautilus. Finally, compare the current situation to the one depicted in May, 2007: Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists when there were… Continue reading Nature Network’s first birthday!

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Disciplinary science has a rather short-term memory (see the reference section of peer review articles) while science publishing is relying on the long-term version, especially if it is the journal Nature, published first in 1869. Now they launched an innovative new site dedicated solely to the history of the journal, full with multimedia snippets and… Continue reading Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Mitochondria in the tubes of stem cells poster on Nature Precedings

Back in June I was a happy beta tester of Nature Precedings, Nature’s own free preprint server. I uploaded a poster of our group called Intact mitochondria migrate in membrane tubular network connections formed between human stem cells by Csordas, Attila, Cselenyák, Attila, Uher, Ferenc, Murányi, Marianna, Hennerbichler, Simone, Redl, Heinz, Kollai, Márk, and Lacza,… Continue reading Mitochondria in the tubes of stem cells poster on Nature Precedings

People I missed on SciFoo Camp, 2007: The Google Scholar team

There were around 200 campers at the SciFoo Camp, but there are at least 10 times more who could also be easily invited by the same token. There was only real surprise to me concerning the missing: I’ve never found the Google Scholar team members. Where were the Scholar founders, Anurag Acharya and Alex Verstak,… Continue reading People I missed on SciFoo Camp, 2007: The Google Scholar team

Microfluidics at SciFoo, 2007: packing cells into bubbles

Microfluidics deals with the behavior, precise control and manipulation of microliter and nanoliter volumes of fluids. Manu Prakash, grad student from the M.I.T.’s Center for Bits and Atoms had a 100% presentation on microfluidics at the SciFoo Camp, 2007. The small audience (I remember Jeff Hawkins and Lincoln Stein amongst others) was really amazed by… Continue reading Microfluidics at SciFoo, 2007: packing cells into bubbles

3minutemadness at SciFoo, 2007

At the opening session at SciFoo at the Googleplex, everybody had to stand up and say 1 intro sentence and 3 words or phrases describing the interests and expertises of the person. pseudonomad caught my intro (the name of the picture: 3minutemadness) with his iPhone: What did I say exactly: don’t remember the intro (a… Continue reading 3minutemadness at SciFoo, 2007

Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

Let’s give a chance to audio articles, a new initiative being trialed by Nature Clinical Practice. “These are FREE full-text audio versions of printed content from the March 2007 issue of Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology. The aim of the Nature Clinical Practice journals is ‘to translate the latest findings into clinical practice’ by highlighting important… Continue reading Nature Clinical Practice audio articles: keeping busy doctors updated

SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

The Google Hacks book from O’Reilly was one out of the free goodies on the SciFoo last weekend. Hack #3 is Visualize Google Results with the TouchGraph Java applet that allows you to visually explore the connections between related websites. Of course I started with the term “scifoo” with the setting of filtering single nodes… Continue reading SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

SciFoo is over, and I’ve just arrived back to New Orleans from SF. First of all: a big thanks for the organizers (Chris DiBona, Timo Hannay, Tim O’Reilly, Google, Nature, O’Reilly) and campers, it was really the highest end. Here is a quick SciFoo key terms summary (photos, detailed accounts later): “scientific data” One of… Continue reading SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Nature Precedings: a free preprint, poster and presentation sharing science service

Nature Precedings is “a free online service that enables researchers to rapidly share, discuss, and cite their early findings” launched on 18th June. I was really happy to be a beta tester, contribute and help to clear out some bugs. This line is from one of my mails 2 weeks before: “I find the idea… Continue reading Nature Precedings: a free preprint, poster and presentation sharing science service

Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

The Natureplex (Nature Web Publishing Department on the second floor of a renovated warehouse with around 25 people near at King’s Cross, London) nerds are still busy: Scintilla, a science recommendation engine was launched based on aggregating science content from RSS/Atom feeds of various websites. How could Scintilla (check what the term scintillation refers to,… Continue reading Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex