Mapping neurons without glial cells ~ SNP genotyping w/o whole sequencing?

Nature’s Journal Club column is usually a good & always a short read providing exciting angles on scientific topics/papers from good researchers. Recently ‘neuroscientist’ Dave Featherstone argued for a broader approach to brain mapping by not restricting it only to the connectome between neurons. Neurons are making up less than 10% of the human brain… Continue reading Mapping neurons without glial cells ~ SNP genotyping w/o whole sequencing?

Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

Nature’s newest issue has a Quantitative genetics supplement with 3 free access pieces included out which I find this review the most interesting: Reverse engineering the genotype–phenotype map with natural genetic variation by Matthew V. Rockman. There’s a lot information to digest and many patterns to understand in this background field in order to approach… Continue reading Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

The newest Nature issue concentrates on personal genomics and its consequences via many types of articles some of them with free access. I only read 1 piece so far by Erika Check Hayden, who has the exclusive freedom at Nature to always pick the best stories and write on any of them, but being a… Continue reading Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

“blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

A new, completely rewritten, integrated nature.com website blogs.nature.com has been launched by the Natureplex people – informed his Twitter pals Euan Adie: Also, blogs.nature.com v1 is live! Tequila and donuts all round. Early n’ often release v2 coming on the 18th so get any bug reports in now. Suggest good science blogs that are not… Continue reading “blogs.nature.com v1 is live” and beyond

Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

I always had the feeling that the Natureplex (the web division of the Nature Publishing Group headed by Timo Hannay) is ahead of most scientific journal publishing conglomerate’s similar departments. Now with the help of a new Google Trends layer that compares websites in terms of traffic this impression was confirmed again without strict numbers.… Continue reading Compare scientific websites with a new Google Trends layer!

What path would you follow: Shumway or Barnard?

Monya Baker has an excellent Q&A with the authors of the recent Nature Insight: Regenerative Medicine over at The Niche blog. Ken Chien, the author of Regenerative medicine and human models of human disease – see earlier post – recalls the paradigmatic story of heart transplantation and the 2 main surgeons behind, Norman Shumway and… Continue reading What path would you follow: Shumway or Barnard?

Problem: embryonic stem cell lines vary & iPS lines too

Finally I started to digest all the articles (usually on the streetcar on my way to work and home) from the recent Nature Insight: Regenerative Medicine and I try to pick up some stories for you (& interesting enough for me) from that, in case you are not lucky enough to have an available copy.… Continue reading Problem: embryonic stem cell lines vary & iPS lines too

Personal genetics test-takers are future risk-takers

A good introduction in Nature on the risks and advantages of letting people know their genetic risk information via personal genetics services. I do hope that the test-takers will finally become the risk overtakers. Helen Pearson: Genetic testing for everyone Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is a rapidly growing market — the past year has seen the… Continue reading Personal genetics test-takers are future risk-takers

Human proteome project: 21000 genes/1 protein, 10 years, $1 billion?

In order to have the slightest change to design a robust, systemic life extension technology, we need to accumulate every systemic macromolecular, cellular, tissue- and organ level data of the normal, physiological human body, connect the trillions of nodes with scalable software algorithms and suck out the draft of the proper sequence of consecutive treatment/regeneration… Continue reading Human proteome project: 21000 genes/1 protein, 10 years, $1 billion?

Nature’s Great Beyond on the Warda-Han-Proteomics-Creator paper

Peer review, ‘a mighty creator’ and an almighty row However the paper was only retracted for “a substantial overlap of the content of this article with previously published articles in other journals.”, not for the strange “mighty creator” line. Peer review isn’t perfect but you’d hope it would catch something like this.

Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Finally the Google PageRank algorithm, the core analysis tool of the current web is back to where its idea is originated from, scientific citation analysis. The recently launched SCImago Journal & Country Rank database uses an algorithm very similar to PageRank. It has a new metric: the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). According to Nature: A… Continue reading Stat freaks, are you ready to play with the SCImago Journal & Country Rank?

Nature Editor-in-Chief’s changed mind on enhancement drugs for healthy people

Philip Campbell, the open editor-in-chief of Nature was asked by John Brockman under the cover of the 2008 Edge Annual Question: WHAT HAVE YOU CHANGED YOUR MIND ABOUT? WHY? Campbell writes in his thoughtful answer: “I’ve changed my mind about the use of enhancement drugs by healthy people. A year ago, if asked, I’d have… Continue reading Nature Editor-in-Chief’s changed mind on enhancement drugs for healthy people

The received view in 3.5 paragraphs on Ending Aging in Nature (part 1)

In the 15 November Nature issue Judy Illes neurology professor turned neuroethics expert reviews Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People by John Harris and Ending Aging: The Rejuvenation Breakthroughs That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetime by Aubrey de Grey & Michael Rae. From the review: “Ending Aging is a more… Continue reading The received view in 3.5 paragraphs on Ending Aging in Nature (part 1)

23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

“We are all from the same seed” – Kara Swisher summarizes what she heard from Linda Avey, co-founder of web based personal genome service 23andMe in the video interview below. Linda and the other founder Anne Wojcicki just talked about the company’s ancestry, genetic comparison and similarity seeking services, the ones that will technologically turned… Continue reading 23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

Interdisciplinarity explained: “Eclectic others, who are smart and fun to have around”

I’ve found the following perfect quote in Paul Smaglik’s NatureJobs report on the current human brain mapping efforts of scientists all around the world (emphasis by me): Interdisciplinary groups are trying to combine imaging approaches and analyse them with statistics, and computational and mathematical modelling. Nikos Logothetis, a professor in physiology and cognitive processes at… Continue reading Interdisciplinarity explained: “Eclectic others, who are smart and fun to have around”

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Disciplinary science has a rather short-term memory (see the reference section of peer review articles) while science publishing is relying on the long-term version, especially if it is the journal Nature, published first in 1869. Now they launched an innovative new site dedicated solely to the history of the journal, full with multimedia snippets and… Continue reading Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Here is a classical web story told in links: a niche blogger got an idea and tries to outsource it, it is popularized by other bloggers, then goes mainstream with the help of a science journal, grows over little blogger’s head and get realized by another powerful science institution. That’s what happened with my unofficial… Continue reading The Laboratory Website and Video Awards by the Scientist!

Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Even those scientists, who don’t have any journalism, or out of niche discipline interests (the vast majority), would be eager to take a closer look at how Nature, the number one scientific weekly journal is made, how the articles are peer reviewed, how the column structure looks like, what are the future perspectives of Nature… Continue reading Visiting the Nature Headquarters, part 1: the internal Nurture blog

Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

The edited version of Pimm’s January 30th, 2007 post How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds? was published in The Summer 2007 issue of Nurture, the magazine for past and present Nature journal authors. According to Maxine Clarke, Nurture editor: The Summer 2007 Issue of Nurture celebrates our blossoming “science 2.0” activities,… Continue reading Pimm’s Pubmed filter post in Nurture’s “Science 2.0” issue

Mitochondria in the tubes of stem cells poster on Nature Precedings

Back in June I was a happy beta tester of Nature Precedings, Nature’s own free preprint server. I uploaded a poster of our group called Intact mitochondria migrate in membrane tubular network connections formed between human stem cells by Csordas, Attila, Cselenyák, Attila, Uher, Ferenc, Murányi, Marianna, Hennerbichler, Simone, Redl, Heinz, Kollai, Márk, and Lacza,… Continue reading Mitochondria in the tubes of stem cells poster on Nature Precedings

Meet the nodes, “clustered hubs” and links of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

Network biology is a way to integrate fragmented benchwork data in order to understand complex biological phenomena. In a recent Nature paper, entitled Integrating molecular and network biology to decode endocytosis Cambridge (UK) researchers authors Eva Schmid and Harvey McMahon of MRC, Cambridge give a good example of a predictive and experimentally useful systems biology… Continue reading Meet the nodes, “clustered hubs” and links of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

Maxine Clarke over at Nature’s Nautilus blog published Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads. July was a particularly strong month for Nature concerning pluripotency and embryonic stem cells as 5 out of the 10 top ten downloads, that is 50% of the most popular articles are tinkering with stem cell biology. The other trend: microRNAs,… Continue reading Trends in Nature’s July top ten PDF downloads: 5 stem cell papers!

SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

SciFoo is over, and I’ve just arrived back to New Orleans from SF. First of all: a big thanks for the organizers (Chris DiBona, Timo Hannay, Tim O’Reilly, Google, Nature, O’Reilly) and campers, it was really the highest end. Here is a quick SciFoo key terms summary (photos, detailed accounts later): “scientific data” One of… Continue reading SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

The architecture of the scientific web, a must read/see from Timo Hannay

Natureplex boss Timo Hannay published a landmark article draft on the web opportunities for the (more and more NPG boosted) scientific web. He highlighted 3 areas: audio-video content, databases (my emphasis), social software and summarized the science webspace with an artistic figure:

Nature’s Superb Many Worlds Retro Cartoon Cover, quantum physics and SF

The current issue of Nature looks like something especially targeted for geeks with a high end content. Consider again the role of comics in science popularization. Is this Nature, not Wired? From the Editor’s Summary: “Yes, this is Nature. The cover art, by David Parkins, salutes a big year for quantum physics: 50 years ago,… Continue reading Nature’s Superb Many Worlds Retro Cartoon Cover, quantum physics and SF

Nature Precedings: a free preprint, poster and presentation sharing science service

Nature Precedings is “a free online service that enables researchers to rapidly share, discuss, and cite their early findings” launched on 18th June. I was really happy to be a beta tester, contribute and help to clear out some bugs. This line is from one of my mails 2 weeks before: “I find the idea… Continue reading Nature Precedings: a free preprint, poster and presentation sharing science service

Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

me: Hi Bora, can you send me the Nature piece on the Blogging Anthology? I am not in the Institute and do not have subscription http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v447/n7146/full/447779b.html Sent at 8:58 PM on Wednesday me: cheers 🙂 Bora: No problem. Thanks. me: wait that is some old stuff. Published online: 22 January 2007; | doi:10.1038/news070122-I’ve read that… Continue reading Uncensored gmail chat between 2 science bloggers on adult issues

Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

The Natureplex (Nature Web Publishing Department on the second floor of a renovated warehouse with around 25 people near at King’s Cross, London) nerds are still busy: Scintilla, a science recommendation engine was launched based on aggregating science content from RSS/Atom feeds of various websites. How could Scintilla (check what the term scintillation refers to,… Continue reading Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

In my opinion the Google of science publishing is the umbrella brand Nature Publishing Group. The best indicator of it is the growing number of freshly released beta products making NPG web initiatives a heaven for scientific early adopters. As Timo Hannay, web editor of Nature said in an interview in Spiegel: The core business… Continue reading Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

How many fine niche stem cell blogs do you know? 4-3-2-1? How many with an attractive, easy to remember name? 0? Good, short, actual and proper blog names are rare. Let me introduce you The Niche which intends to become THE Stem Cell Blog in the niche of the niches. It is the newest Nature… Continue reading The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

Nature Reports Stem Cells is live from now on…for stem cell enthusiasts

No more waiting: Nature Reports Stem Cells (NRSC) launched today, and so finally there is a fully web native, scientifically high-end (naturally), freely accessible, all-in-one stem cell research hub site for everyone (especially for the researchers) to read, share, contribute and turn the acquired insights back into new experiments, policies, ethics, businesses and clinical trials.… Continue reading Nature Reports Stem Cells is live from now on…for stem cell enthusiasts

Industry and career focused stem cell report in the current Nature volume

Positively tuned (for the most part) report on stem cell science by Ricki Lewis: The hard cell Nature 447, 748-749 (June 2007) Excerpts, emphasis added by me: research in the field is thriving globally. At least 500 companies and collaborations have sprung up, 100 of them in the past year alone… A solid background for… Continue reading Industry and career focused stem cell report in the current Nature volume

Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Wow, I feel fresh air, although I am not sure whether the following news is a beginning of any deeper changes or not: From Science Authors Guideline: “Because of changes Microsoft has made in its recent Word release that are incompatible with our internal workflow, which was built around previous versions of the software, Science… Continue reading Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

OK folks, after reading the official rules about how to get and manage a doctoral thesis, and after speaking with my supervisor asking for his permission, I’ve decided to edit my ongoing doctoral thesis in Pimm. Or at least the introduction of it, which is intended to be no other than a review-like summary of… Continue reading Editing my doctoral thesis on stem cells in a blog: Why not?

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists

If you are busy building a professional career and want things to get done, it’s time to forget MySpace, Facebook or any other social networking 1.0 sites, that are focusing on friendship, love, spam whatever with a general membership. What you need is social networking 2.0, which is based on the special profession you’re in,… Continue reading Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists