Human proteome project: 21000 genes/1 protein, 10 years, $1 billion?

In order to have the slightest change to design a robust, systemic life extension technology, we need to accumulate every systemic macromolecular, cellular, tissue- and organ level data of the normal, physiological human body, connect the trillions of nodes with scalable software algorithms and suck out the draft of the proper sequence of consecutive treatment/regeneration… Continue reading Human proteome project: 21000 genes/1 protein, 10 years, $1 billion?

Oxygen control of stem cell niches and cell fates

Did you know that physiological normoxia generally falls in the 2-9% O2 (14.4-64.8 mm Hg) range for most adult cells in vivo? 3 remarkable exceptions are thymus, kidney medulla and most importantly bone marrow which can exist at 1% O2 (7.2 mm Hg). On the other hand, stem and progenitor cells are frequent residents of… Continue reading Oxygen control of stem cell niches and cell fates

Nature’s Great Beyond on the Warda-Han-Proteomics-Creator paper

Peer review, ‘a mighty creator’ and an almighty row However the paper was only retracted for “a substantial overlap of the content of this article with previously published articles in other journals.”, not for the strange “mighty creator” line. Peer review isn’t perfect but you’d hope it would catch something like this.

Nature Network’s first birthday!

Nature Network is 1 year old! A good retrospective summary by Matt Brown and Corie Lok: Happy Birthday Nature Network Also check Maxine Clarke’s snapshot on NN over at Nautilus. Finally, compare the current situation to the one depicted in May, 2007: Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists when there were… Continue reading Nature Network’s first birthday!

Bureaucrats and the overuse of the passive voice in science writing

I’ve found the following fine paragraph in the Autumn edition of Nurture, the magazine for past and present Nature journal authors. Linda Cooper writes on “How to make research accessible”: Take the overuse of the passive voice. Scientists tend to think that the passive voice creates an objective tone. But when they rely too heavily… Continue reading Bureaucrats and the overuse of the passive voice in science writing

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

I met Maxine online first when she commented my post on the The problem of online “supporting information” in peer-review articles and then interviewed her on Nature policies concerning the same problem. Then I met Maxine offline in London and learnt a lot on how every issue of Nature is born and other insights I… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?