Informational emergency in the operating room: does it count as a right?

I found this exciting case in the book (yes, I am still reading those) of Lancet editor-in-chief Richard Horton called: Second Opinion: Doctors, Diseases and Decisions in Modern Medicine “Surgery is all about action, not reflection. But information is sometimes critical, even in the operating room. In 2002, surgeons in Australia were working frantically to… Continue reading Informational emergency in the operating room: does it count as a right?

Maximum Life’s James Clement: what can a lawyer do for life extension?

James Clement is an attorney and serial entrepreneur. He is the Chief Operating Officer of Maximum Life Foundation which supports aging and life extension research with a mature and secure VC fund strategy (next blogterviewee, David Kekich, C.E.O. of MaxLife). 1. What is the story of your life extension commitment? I have been interested in… Continue reading Maximum Life’s James Clement: what can a lawyer do for life extension?

FDA Stem Cell Therapy Regulation: the Framework

Dina Gould Halme and David A. Kessler wrote an article, called FDA Regulation of Stem-Cell–Based Therapies in The New England Journal of Medicine. The key concerns are: i., Stem-cell–based products as therapeutic agents are or could be: biologic products, drugs, devices, xenotransplantation products, human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products. Human cells, tissues, and… Continue reading FDA Stem Cell Therapy Regulation: the Framework

Non-profit trial to speed up embryonic stem cell research through patent narrowing

From The Scientist by Cathy Tran: At the request of a coalition of non-profit groups, which was initiated by groups in California, a state that has a lot at stake as a result Proposition 71, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) is reexamining patents covering all primate embryonic stem cells, as well as stem-cell… Continue reading Non-profit trial to speed up embryonic stem cell research through patent narrowing

Can partial immortalization be permissible to those who can buy it?

In the last philosophical-political section of Pimm I tried to delineate how to protect the right for partial immortalization when the costs of the treatment are extremely high. After it turned out that on the grounds of equal dignity it is hard to make the treatment impossible for those, who can afford it, the second… Continue reading Can partial immortalization be permissible to those who can buy it?