The Decision Tree: Thomas Goetz’s upcoming book on predictive/personalized medicine

In the past months Thomas Goetz begun writing a book on the radical changes already ongoing but mostly upcoming in healthcare due to affordable new technologies and quantitative approaches in personalized genomics and medicine. The book is to be called The Decision Tree (explanation below) accompanied by a new website. Thomas is the perfect man… Continue reading The Decision Tree: Thomas Goetz’s upcoming book on predictive/personalized medicine

Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

The newest Nature issue concentrates on personal genomics and its consequences via many types of articles some of them with free access. I only read 1 piece so far by Erika Check Hayden, who has the exclusive freedom at Nature to always pick the best stories and write on any of them, but being a… Continue reading Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

Petabyte Age Wiredesque lesson on what science can learn from Google

I argued many times here that biology based biotechnology is the next information technology but in order to do so, biotech should harness good IT patterns and mimic its massive computing practices to handle the enormous amount of constantly accumulating data. Often this trend could be summarized in a simple way: keep your eye on… Continue reading Petabyte Age Wiredesque lesson on what science can learn from Google

80 is the new 50 so Carl Icahn has a blog without content.

Billionaire investor Carl Icahn (72) recently made the bloglines with his energetic position on the Microsoft – Yahoo deal. He has a blog too or at least it is coming soon since 01/31. /Having a blog for more than 3 months without any content is kinda equivalent with planning to sign up for Twitter but… Continue reading 80 is the new 50 so Carl Icahn has a blog without content.

Puzzle: Which Wired article is cited in Nature Biotechnology?

Nature Biotechnology is the (peer review) journal for me: it’s geeky, fresh and it takes into account more than just one point-of-view, that of the scientist-academist’s: technology & business are hand in hands also. (Recommending Nat Biotech makes a niche sense here while recommending Nature, which is actually the only science journal I’m reading issue… Continue reading Puzzle: Which Wired article is cited in Nature Biotechnology?

What you get when you multiply the same ideas by different inventors!

Malcolm Gladwell has a nice, but a bit Microsoft heavy essay on scientific/technological multiples, ie. the phenomenon of simultaneous discovery in New Yorker: In the Air Gladwell argues that it is always misleading to apply the paradigm of artistic invention to scientific/technological invention and he is probably right. Two sections just for your appetite: “This… Continue reading What you get when you multiply the same ideas by different inventors!

Social or semantic connections? Tell me, infofriend!

Clive Thompson – undoubtedly a good journalist – has a piece, entitled Information Overlord in May Wired issue (not online yet, but already problematic) on his experience with semantic Web app Twine. Clive also formulates a provocative though about the value of information modulated social connections. “But the truth is, sometimes social connections are less… Continue reading Social or semantic connections? Tell me, infofriend!

Michael Kingsley on competitive, bitter, boomer longevity

Michael Kingsley – diagnosed with Parkinson disease at the age 42 – wrote an utterly fatalist, sad&straight and death conscious essay entitled Mine Is Longer than Yours on the last boomer game he calls competitive longevity published in the New Yorker. This piece is the dark counterpart of the recent Wired Kurzweil coverage on Mr.… Continue reading Michael Kingsley on competitive, bitter, boomer longevity

Kurzweil follow-up in life extension exhausted Wired

Last year I approached a powerful Wired editor with the following story pitch: “A full and deep but cool report on the current (scientific) life extension technologies, persons, battles, camps, grants, problems, perspectives.” His reply was a diplomatic and definite naysaying: “Thanks for the idea. Alas, we’ve done *way* too many stories on life-extension over… Continue reading Kurzweil follow-up in life extension exhausted Wired

The New York Times advertises itself with stem cell research

I’ve just noticed a New York Times paid “stem cell research” Google Adwords ad in my gmail inbox besides the automated “Rejuvenation Research Vol. 11, No. 1, Feb 2008 is now available online” mail. That said, The New York Times is ranking the “stem cell” buzzword high and fishes for layman readers interested in the… Continue reading The New York Times advertises itself with stem cell research

Working without a personal assistant on the top of the big G…is fun!

I’m on my way to a Friday comprehensive exam from stem cell and mitochondrial biology which gives me no time to immerse into blogging this week. I mostly think of big holes in my knowledge like mitochondria and Ca2+ signalling. That’s why I can only offer soft things like the following quote from a fresh… Continue reading Working without a personal assistant on the top of the big G…is fun!

Partial immortalisation goes mainstream with an ‘s’ – thanks to the Economist!

The Economist print edition (Jan 3rd) has a summary article on the current healthy and scientific life extension scene starting with Aubrey De Grey’s engineering, umbrella SENS approach and talking about anti-oxidants, mitochondria, sirtuin activators and stem cell based regenerative medicine amongst others. To my positive surprise the unknown writer of the article (do you… Continue reading Partial immortalisation goes mainstream with an ‘s’ – thanks to the Economist!

Biogeekipedia: collecting raw materials

Wired’s Geekipedia is marketed as “People, places, ideas and trends you need to know now“. As such you can find biology and biotech related terms in it (part of the current hip and tech-savvy culture) like ‘stem cells‘, ‘RNAi‘ or ‘brain implants‘, explained. But you won’t find the terms ‘Natureplex’, ‘executable cell biology’, ‘Open Notebook… Continue reading Biogeekipedia: collecting raw materials

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

I have to interrupt my 23andMe streaming cause there are more interesting things are goin’ on. Chris Patil of Ouroboros has already been a blogterviewee (Part 1, 2, 3) on Pimm. He then shared his detailed views on aging and life extension technologies, but I always wanted to ask Chris about his approach on blogging… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Alien vs. Predator like stupid question for the weekend: Which do you think is the best source when it is about interesting and quality science content: the Techmeme clone Blogrunner (here it’s the science channel of Blogrunner), that is the newly launched automated online news service and blogs aggregator by the New York Times or… Continue reading Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Robust life extension reaches the Washington Post on Halloween day

Let’s meet the informal version of the ‘pro-aging trance’ in a portrait on Aubrey de Grey in the Washington Post (thanks for the tip, Jim): Why is it, when you bring up the idea of living forever — even if robust and healthy, not drooling on your shoes — some people just recoil viscerally? “It’s… Continue reading Robust life extension reaches the Washington Post on Halloween day

Feed reading trends: I am a Valleywag addict, help me!

Show me your feed reading habits and I’ll tell you who you are! I hope this statement is not true as according the item reading trends on Google Reader I have been a serious Valleywag addict in the last 30 days and more, I suspect. Although extensively reading a funny, well-informed but malicious tech gossip… Continue reading Feed reading trends: I am a Valleywag addict, help me!

Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Disciplinary science has a rather short-term memory (see the reference section of peer review articles) while science publishing is relying on the long-term version, especially if it is the journal Nature, published first in 1869. Now they launched an innovative new site dedicated solely to the history of the journal, full with multimedia snippets and… Continue reading Nature’s history site: how to keep the tradition and identity alive

Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

As this very site here is embedded in the blog medium, we could and should be experimental and eclectic in our style as we cannot control (just target) our audience, thank the web. Now a report on a science conference could be addressed to very different audiences, and yesterday I showed an example on how… Continue reading Wired style SENS3 conference intro or be aware of your audience

Unpublished SENS3 conference report for mainstream scientists!

Recently I wrote a meeting report on the SENS3 conference for a very prestigious science journal, but finally it did not go through the filters. I knew that the chance for publication is small as the journal rarely publish such meeting reports and as it was in many respects an unconventional science conference. The standards… Continue reading Unpublished SENS3 conference report for mainstream scientists!

Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

At The Scientist, the editors are awaiting your suggestions on your favorite life science blogs to gather the list of blogs that are especially hot for life science researchers. They asked 7 science bloggers, 5 from ScienceBlogs by SEED (Abel Pharmboy, Bora Zivkovic, Carl Zimmer, Newamul Khan, PZ Myers) and 2 independent bloggers (Ed Silverman… Continue reading Blogs invade The Scientist: vote for your favorite life science blog!

The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

If you compare the Nature and the Science front pages (which is not the topic of the current post) you can notice a big difference: there are a lot of “web 2.0″ish fresh features on the Nature site while significantly fewer on the Science counterpart. Now Science came up with a new, less academic and… Continue reading The Gonzo Scientist on IdeaCity in Science and on the web

Trivia: Joshua Davis, the journalist is not Joshua Davis, the designer

So far I’ve had the wrong belief that my favourite Wired Journalist, Joshua Davis is the same person as Joshua Davis, the designer, who once has been featured in Wired (not by Joshua Davis, the journalist). The root of my misconception was the common source of my knowledge on these 2 guys, namely Wired magazine.… Continue reading Trivia: Joshua Davis, the journalist is not Joshua Davis, the designer

Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

In my opinion the Google of science publishing is the umbrella brand Nature Publishing Group. The best indicator of it is the growing number of freshly released beta products making NPG web initiatives a heaven for scientific early adopters. As Timo Hannay, web editor of Nature said in an interview in Spiegel: The core business… Continue reading Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

How many fine niche stem cell blogs do you know? 4-3-2-1? How many with an attractive, easy to remember name? 0? Good, short, actual and proper blog names are rare. Let me introduce you The Niche which intends to become THE Stem Cell Blog in the niche of the niches. It is the newest Nature… Continue reading The Niche: The Stem Cell Blog hosted by Nature Stem Cell Reports

Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

I’ve just realized how cool is Cell magazine May 4 issue’s cover (the one with the Scientist Enter the Blogosphere report by Laura Bonetta) with the S-nitrosothiol superhero T-shirt. This substance may have some therapeutic utility in diseases such as heart failure and asthma. Illustration: Cell and me this morning. Cartoons are terrific education tools,… Continue reading Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

These two titles are freshly out of my feed readers: B-type natriuretic peptide inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol transfer and steroidogenesis in primary human adrenocortical cells. and In vivo expression of human ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR) using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) serotypes 2 and 8. How user friendly these titles are? Let’s examine me: Theoretically… Continue reading Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

Why aging is an unnatural process? An argument from Atul Gawande

There is a formulation of the argument on why aging should be considered as an unnatural process by Atul Gawande in the current The Way We Age Now report in The New Yorker: “..scientists do not believe that our life spans are actually programmed into us. After all, for most of our hundred-thousand-year existence—all but… Continue reading Why aging is an unnatural process? An argument from Atul Gawande

BioTech(nically), Business 2.0’s new biotech blog

Business 2.0 Blog Beta Network‘s new blog BioTech(nically) was launched written by Marie Cannizzaro who says about herself in the intro post, March 27: “Before joining Business 2.0, I wrote for Dow Jones VentureWire and Stanford Magazine. I have a degree in Human Biology with a concentration in Biotechnology and Bioethics from Stanford University.” At… Continue reading BioTech(nically), Business 2.0’s new biotech blog

Blogxperiment: What are the good ways to summarize peer-review articles?

In future posts I’d like to do a blogxperiment based on comments feedback. My general question is: What is the best way to summarize peer-review articles for a more general readership and transmit scholarly knowledge and literature? What are the opportunities used in blog posts? Figures, abstracts, dense citations, other summarize options, journalist lingo, superficial… Continue reading Blogxperiment: What are the good ways to summarize peer-review articles?

Next big thing at Darpa after the Internet: biology, of course!

When ordinary folks hear the name of Darpa, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Pentagon’s science division, the next association is usually not a military one, but the the insituiton’s role in the nascent Internet. Indeed as Wikipedia inform us: “its original name was simply Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA)…and had a major impact on the… Continue reading Next big thing at Darpa after the Internet: biology, of course!

TierneyLab: new science blog hosted by The New York Times

TierneyLab, the science blog of the professional journalist John Tierney was launched one week at January 15 hosted by The New York Times website with this intro: “I’m hoping to follow the scientific method: experiment to see what works and what doesn’t. I want to give you a chance not just to discuss science but… Continue reading TierneyLab: new science blog hosted by The New York Times