Aquincum Institute of Technology, Budapest, IT & BT shaking hands

There is a nice initiative now in Budapest dedicated to the present and future of high technology: a new private university momentarily dubbed as Aquincum Institute of Technology (AIT) will be built near to the Graphisoft Park in Óbuda (Aquincum) concentrating on competitive information-/biotechnology (mainly bioinformatics) education and entrepreneurship. The main instigator of the project… Continue reading Aquincum Institute of Technology, Budapest, IT & BT shaking hands

Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

Just a simple filtering & highlighting & regurgitating for you based on Andy Oram’s post apropos of the opening of a larger Cambridge, Massachusetts Google office : Why open source developers can be more productive, and other tales from a Google open house Along the lines of self-motivated employees, I asked a manager whether most… Continue reading Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Wow, I guess it’s time for me to move into the stock market business! Here’s the story via David Bradley’s tweet: Julie Kent, Search Engine Journal, April 21st, 2008: Google Wants to Index Genetic Information, Invests in Second DNA Start-Up In 2007, Google made headlines when they invested $4.4 million in 23andMe, a genetic screening… Continue reading How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Dear StartupSearch: Is 23andMe a web-based startup or not?

1. A start-up is a company with a limited operating history (Wikipedia). 2. Startup search “tracks the web technology ecosystem commonly referenced as “Web 2.0.” We collect facts and figures about new web products, startup companies, key startup employees, and the funding dollars powering their growth.” 3. 23andMe is a pioneering web-based, personalized genomics startup… Continue reading Dear StartupSearch: Is 23andMe a web-based startup or not?

Web entrepreneurs and biotech: strangers from distant lands

Elrond: Strangers from distant lands, friends of old you have been summoned here to answer the threat of Mordor. Middle Earth stands upon the brink of destruction, none can escape it. You will unite or you will fall. Each race is bound to this fate, this one doom. Bring forth the ring, Frodo. [Frodo puts… Continue reading Web entrepreneurs and biotech: strangers from distant lands

The new faces of Silicon Valley: biotech-savvy co-founders Avey-Wojcicki

After Jobs-Wozniak, Yang-Filo, Brin-Page, it’s time to memorize the names of the co-founders of 23andMe, the first personalized genome service, who are turning the tech establishment into a biotech mode. The new faces of Silicon Valley: the age of Blue Jeans/Black T-Shirt co-founder computer nerds is over, welcome to the era of stylish, well-dressed genetics-savvy… Continue reading The new faces of Silicon Valley: biotech-savvy co-founders Avey-Wojcicki

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

Craig Venter and Tim O’Reilly chat: when 2 worlds meet

Biotech is the next infotech (or at least the 2 worlds need to be merged) and it is good to detect the signs of the growing biotech interest on part of the general tech crowd. At the Web 2.0 summit (organised by and for the Silicon Valley tech-media establishment) Tim O’ Reilly asked Craig Just… Continue reading Craig Venter and Tim O’Reilly chat: when 2 worlds meet

Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

The biggest impact of the Austin Maker Faire on me was that yesterday I bought an open source, CC licensed Arduino microcontroller and a breadboard for building prototype electronic circuits. I am a total rookie in home electronics but I thought it’s never too late to learn completely new things with the help of our… Continue reading Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

Venter on the Web 2.0 summit, Mayer on Google Health and petabytes

The ongoing mainstream Web 2.0 summit has a little coverage on health and biomedicine too: an upcoming conversation with genomics maverick, uncovered Craig Venter and a past presentation by Marissa Mayer, Google’s Vice President for Search Products & User Experience, on health information. Sarah Milstein says: “They’re also interested in helping you store and access… Continue reading Venter on the Web 2.0 summit, Mayer on Google Health and petabytes

SENS3 conference videos online on a personal website

Similarly to the Edmonton Aging Symposium which reportedly “was a WORLD FIRST! in being streamed live onto the internet” (Kevin Perrott) amongst conferences, a selection of the presentations of the SENS3 conference are now available at the personal website of Richard Schueler. Richard is a big mouthed, cowboy hat geek with a serious life extension… Continue reading SENS3 conference videos online on a personal website

Dean Kamen’s 5 min TED talk on the robotic arm project

When Anna and me are looking for something interesting, but not too lengthy and detailed quality video content on the web our frequent destination is TED Talks. These videos are ideal during a lunch, or just before bedtime. In the newest TED sequence inventor Dean Kamen previews the extraordinary prosthetic arm his team is developing.… Continue reading Dean Kamen’s 5 min TED talk on the robotic arm project

Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

In my opinion the Google of science publishing is the umbrella brand Nature Publishing Group. The best indicator of it is the growing number of freshly released beta products making NPG web initiatives a heaven for scientific early adopters. As Timo Hannay, web editor of Nature said in an interview in Spiegel: The core business… Continue reading Biotech Geek Blogger goes Nature Stem Cell Blogger at the Niche

Aubrey de Grey’s Google TechTalk on Prospects for extending healthy life – a lot

Aubrey de Grey‘s presentation in Google Tech Talk series at the Googleplex, Mountain View, May 29, 2007 (Thanks, Russell Whitaker). More on Aubrey on Pimm: Content of Ending Aging, Aubrey de Grey’s coming life extension book 3 Edmonton Aging (Life Extension) Symposium videos Blogterview with Aubrey de Grey: life extension stories

Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

In the age of compelling technology analogies and nomenclatures it was unavoidable that somebody at last identifies enough differences in the history of industrial regenerative medicine to tell Regenerative Medicine 1.0 from 2.0. The man behind is Chris Mason, Group Leader of Stem Cell + Regenerative Medicine Bioprocessing Unit, University College London and cofounder and… Continue reading Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Builders, Hackers, Do-It-Yourselfers are gathering around this weekend at the most visible embodiment of the Maker spirit, the Maker Faire 2007 at San Mateo Fairgrounds, California. I remember the inquisitive and incredulous eyes of the traditional tech makers, coders, engineers while presenting my placental stem cell project at Euro Maker Faire last year. Now imagine… Continue reading Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Maxine Clarke, Nature’s blogactive and web-oriented Publishing Executive Editor blogged on has an interesting and opinionated editorial on Share your lab notes in Nature 447, 1-2 (3 May 2007). also available at Nautilus. Her The line of argument is: The use of electronic laboratory notebooks should be supported by all concerned since they “contain data… Continue reading Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

What does a good laboratory homepage look like? Show me at least one!

In life sciences the basic, functional unit of cooperation and research is a LAB. Now am I alone with my opinion that most academic laboratory web pages simply do not meet any advanced, current, dynamic web standards, although this would be crucial for them? What information should a good laboratory homepage offer, and what design… Continue reading What does a good laboratory homepage look like? Show me at least one!

All American Stem Cell Companies = 1 YouTube = $1.65 billion

Did you ever think that the market value of all public stem cell companies is $1.655 billion, which is exactly (+5 million) the amount of money Google Acquired YouTube in a stock-for-stock transaction in October, 2006? This fact sheds new light on the maturity of the information technology and biotechnology markets. Let’s make hypes into… Continue reading All American Stem Cell Companies = 1 YouTube = $1.65 billion

23andMe: the early bird of web based biotech startups

23andMe is a biotech focused web startup based in Mountain View, California (yes, the Googleplex neighbourhood) self-defined as “an early stage startup developing tools and producing content to help people make sense of their genetic information. Our goal is to take advantage of new genotyping technologies and help consumers explore their genetics, informed by cutting… Continue reading 23andMe: the early bird of web based biotech startups

Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

Check out Grailsearch.org, which was started at the end of January and is hosted by software engineer Jim Craig with a deep interest in aging and bioinformatics. Grailsearch is a “community web portal intended for use by biogerontologists, students of biogerontology, software engineers, biochemists or anyone else interested in working towards the search for systems… Continue reading Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

The Best of Technology Writing 2007 will be published by digitalculturebooks with the guest editor Steven Levy. So they are “asking readers to nominate their favorite tech-oriented articles, essays, and blog posts from 2006. The competition is open to any and every technology topic–biotech, information technology, gadgetry, tech policy, Silicon Valley, and software engineering are… Continue reading Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

Best companies to work for: IT Google and BT Genentech

According to Fortune Magazine January 22 Issue, the best 2 Amercian companies to work for are from the high tech domain and from the Bay Area: Google, the IT Lord, and Genentech, the first real biotech company founded in 1976, which is the Apple of the biotech industry. As Genentech CEO and Google board member… Continue reading Best companies to work for: IT Google and BT Genentech

The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

Check out the brand new BioMed Search, it is fantastic, currently over 1 million images have been indexed from peer-review journals in biomedical fields and more is on its way. BioMed Search has been created by Alex Ksikes, currently a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science with focus in Computational Learning Theory at the University of… Continue reading The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

The bioinformatics bet: what can IT folks do for life extension?

Briefly: A lot. As you might have noticed, for me as biotechnologist/life extensionist, the most important reference group is the group of IT people, because of the engineering approach, software-hardware tools, intuition concerning technology and funds. After Reason and Chris, our next answerer is Jim Craig, who published his answers here as a comment first… Continue reading The bioinformatics bet: what can IT folks do for life extension?

Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering Conference: Blog and Wiki

As I’ve mentioned before from tomorrow I will be at Sant Feliu de Guixols, Spain, at the Conference Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering, 28.10-2.11,2006 organized by the European Science Foundation. The official website of the conference is: http://www.esf.org/conferences/lc06213 In the IT sector it is more and more natural that a Conference has a wiki and… Continue reading Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering Conference: Blog and Wiki

What would happen if Bill Gates invested 3 billion dollars to embryonic stem cell research?

There is a dense comment debate on Bodyhack for more than a week concerning the electoral Missouri Stem Cell Hunter issue, celebs with ESC pro- or contra ads. Here is an effective comment from today’s related post by the commenter named Orrin: “I wonder what would happen if Bill Gates invested 2 billion dollars to… Continue reading What would happen if Bill Gates invested 3 billion dollars to embryonic stem cell research?

First full-time biotech employee at Google BioLabs

Hello everybody, let me introduce myself: I am the first full-time biotechnologist at Google Inc. (well, not really). My job at Google is fascinating: I have to plan and build a comprehensive regenerative database/map of the complete human body which will be the input of the ultimate human regenerative software. It is so, because in… Continue reading First full-time biotech employee at Google BioLabs