Aquincum Institute of Technology, Budapest, IT & BT shaking hands

There is a nice initiative now in Budapest dedicated to the present and future of high technology: a new private university momentarily dubbed as Aquincum Institute of Technology (AIT) will be built near to the Graphisoft Park in Óbuda (Aquincum) concentrating on competitive information-/biotechnology (mainly bioinformatics) education and entrepreneurship. The main instigator of the project… Continue reading Aquincum Institute of Technology, Budapest, IT & BT shaking hands

The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Following Matt Cutts’s tweet I am now writing my blog post using the CrossOver Chromium browser which is a Mac and Linux port of the open source Chromium web browser. Google Chrome (Windows-only so far) is built with open source code from Chromium that means I have now a functional Google Chrome clone under Leopard on… Continue reading The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Sergey Brin goes mobile in 2000 & a Russian lesson

Sergey Brin, Google co-founder is a very interesting man. His story is the number one immigrant success story in the USA today, I dare say. I have 2 Brin videos to show you today: In the first one, Sergey demonstrates mobility in 2000 in 3 ways with his ‘faint accent that is no longer identifiably… Continue reading Sergey Brin goes mobile in 2000 & a Russian lesson

Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

Just a simple filtering & highlighting & regurgitating for you based on Andy Oram’s post apropos of the opening of a larger Cambridge, Massachusetts Google office : Why open source developers can be more productive, and other tales from a Google open house Along the lines of self-motivated employees, I asked a manager whether most… Continue reading Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Wow, I guess it’s time for me to move into the stock market business! Here’s the story via David Bradley’s tweet: Julie Kent, Search Engine Journal, April 21st, 2008: Google Wants to Index Genetic Information, Invests in Second DNA Start-Up In 2007, Google made headlines when they invested $4.4 million in 23andMe, a genetic screening… Continue reading How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Low budget, high tech: Microfluidics device out of a $50 plotter!

Building and using low budget but high tech devices at home is a main motivation behind hacking. A Harvard Chemistry Research Group now created a microchannel producing device using a Hewlett Packard 7550A Graphics Plotter (see some eBay prices) to perform a diagnostic protein assay with it amongst others. /See my SciFoo microfluidics coverage./ According… Continue reading Low budget, high tech: Microfluidics device out of a $50 plotter!

My iPhone 2.0 wish list: from the RFID reader/writer to the solar panel!

According to the Wikipedia approved rumor by the AT&T boss: “A new version of Apple’s iPhone will be introduced in 2008 that is capable of operating on faster 3G cellular networks.” Besides the 3G support I have some other expectations (at least 6 should be satisfied) too in order to become a next generation iPhone… Continue reading My iPhone 2.0 wish list: from the RFID reader/writer to the solar panel!

Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

The biggest impact of the Austin Maker Faire on me was that yesterday I bought an open source, CC licensed Arduino microcontroller and a breadboard for building prototype electronic circuits. I am a total rookie in home electronics but I thought it’s never too late to learn completely new things with the help of our… Continue reading Arduino Diecimila: my first microcontroller ever

Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

Google’s Palimpsest project, once realized (in the near future) has the potential to change the way science is done by accepting gigantic (raw?) data sets from all disciplines and making them open and free (including dark data?). Jon Trowbridge from Google Inc. had a presentation on SciFoo, 2007 at the Googleplex not documented well, but… Continue reading Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

The iPhone case: the hackers may have the law on their side!

I’ve activated my iPhone in a prepaid mode exactly for the reason of being flexible and switch to another network provider ASAP. So I do not have a 2 year contract with AT&T and I am happy to say that. The AT&T network and coverage is almost non exisiting in the 2 crucial places of… Continue reading The iPhone case: the hackers may have the law on their side!

SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

The Google Hacks book from O’Reilly was one out of the free goodies on the SciFoo last weekend. Hack #3 is Visualize Google Results with the TouchGraph Java applet that allows you to visually explore the connections between related websites. Of course I started with the term “scifoo” with the setting of filtering single nodes… Continue reading SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

I like Google and Apple products, but my expectations are focusing on how these products can help and facilitate me as a scientist, especially as a biomedical research scientist. With the Science on the iPhone test series I’d like to examine in details how proper and user friendly is the iPhone as an ultimate portable,… Continue reading Science on the iPhone, is it a good SciPhone? Aspects for a test series

3 rules to protect your iPhone from a serious Safari security problem

Charlie Miller, Jake Honoroff, and Joshua Mason, members of the software security team at Independent Security Evaluators had discovered a vulnerability within two weeks of part time work and “developed a toolchain for working with the iPhone’s architecture (which also includes some tools from the #iphone-dev community), and created a proof-of-concept exploit capable of delivering… Continue reading 3 rules to protect your iPhone from a serious Safari security problem

Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

The Natureplex (Nature Web Publishing Department on the second floor of a renovated warehouse with around 25 people near at King’s Cross, London) nerds are still busy: Scintilla, a science recommendation engine was launched based on aggregating science content from RSS/Atom feeds of various websites. How could Scintilla (check what the term scintillation refers to,… Continue reading Scintilla, a science aggregator and recommendation engine freshly from the Natureplex

Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Wow, I feel fresh air, although I am not sure whether the following news is a beginning of any deeper changes or not: From Science Authors Guideline: “Because of changes Microsoft has made in its recent Word release that are incompatible with our internal workflow, which was built around previous versions of the software, Science… Continue reading Forget about submitting your scientific papers written in Word 2007

Google searches: first 3 results or first 30 results?

In What Google Universal Search’s first 30 results know about “biotech blog” I wrote: “Everyday web users are strongly adapted to a situation in which 99% of their information comes from the first 30 results of a Google Search (the first 3 pages with divine power, if the setting is 10 results/page)” But I was… Continue reading Google searches: first 3 results or first 30 results?

Aubrey de Grey’s Google TechTalk on Prospects for extending healthy life – a lot

Aubrey de Grey‘s presentation in Google Tech Talk series at the Googleplex, Mountain View, May 29, 2007 (Thanks, Russell Whitaker). More on Aubrey on Pimm: Content of Ending Aging, Aubrey de Grey’s coming life extension book 3 Edmonton Aging (Life Extension) Symposium videos Blogterview with Aubrey de Grey: life extension stories

Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Maxine Clarke, Nature’s blogactive and web-oriented Publishing Executive Editor blogged on has an interesting and opinionated editorial on Share your lab notes in Nature 447, 1-2 (3 May 2007). also available at Nautilus. Her The line of argument is: The use of electronic laboratory notebooks should be supported by all concerned since they “contain data… Continue reading Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Google Desktop Search Core for Mac Users

Google Desktop Beta search for the Mac is now downloadable, which is a viable alternative to the built-in Spotlight for searching any files on OS X with gmail, web integration. You can reach it from a widget-like app (left) or from the Firefox browser as a tab (right). It made my life easier since I… Continue reading Google Desktop Search Core for Mac Users

Vint Cerf and a flicker of cerfology

Today I visited a presentation of Vint Cerf, whose work in the 70s on the nascent Internet Protocols, like TCP/IP became historical. Mr. Cerf serves as “Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist” of Google, and he has mainly a brand maintaining and popularizer role. Unfortunately he wasn’t asked about his activity on InterPlaNetary Internet Project… Continue reading Vint Cerf and a flicker of cerfology

Mac Googlers at Apple Headquarters: from Mountain View to Cupertino

Read this nice and brand conscious weekend off story on Official Google Mac Blog. Scott Knaster, Mac Team Technical Writer at Google organized a trip for a “gang of new Mac fans at Google“ from Mountain View to Apple headquarters, Cupertino. At the Caffe Macs they were eating a Google-like terrific food, but not for… Continue reading Mac Googlers at Apple Headquarters: from Mountain View to Cupertino

23andMe: the early bird of web based biotech startups

23andMe is a biotech focused web startup based in Mountain View, California (yes, the Googleplex neighbourhood) self-defined as “an early stage startup developing tools and producing content to help people make sense of their genetic information. Our goal is to take advantage of new genotyping technologies and help consumers explore their genetics, informed by cutting… Continue reading 23andMe: the early bird of web based biotech startups

Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

Check out Grailsearch.org, which was started at the end of January and is hosted by software engineer Jim Craig with a deep interest in aging and bioinformatics. Grailsearch is a “community web portal intended for use by biogerontologists, students of biogerontology, software engineers, biochemists or anyone else interested in working towards the search for systems… Continue reading Grailsearch.org: aging information from a systems biology perspective

How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds?

How many people out of you, life scientists, are regularly updating their PubMed searches through RSS feeds? According to the Read/Write Read Blog 2006 Web Technology Trends “While 2006 can’t be seen as the breakthrough year for RSS in the mainstream, we will probably see RSS bloom in 2007”. It’s January, 2007, so let’s upgrade… Continue reading How to filter and read PubMed articles through RSS feeds?

Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

The Best of Technology Writing 2007 will be published by digitalculturebooks with the guest editor Steven Levy. So they are “asking readers to nominate their favorite tech-oriented articles, essays, and blog posts from 2006. The competition is open to any and every technology topic–biotech, information technology, gadgetry, tech policy, Silicon Valley, and software engineering are… Continue reading Nominate your favourite (bio)tech post to get printed

Turn your “pen and paper” protocol into a digital one with Pen-it

There was a nifty product introduced in this week’s Macworld at Frisco: the Pen-it® NOTES. It is a digital pen that converts hand-written analogue information created using “pen and paper” into digital data, enabling the data to be utilised in various applications. When you used the pen on a special patterned and dotted notebook, the… Continue reading Turn your “pen and paper” protocol into a digital one with Pen-it

The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

Check out the brand new BioMed Search, it is fantastic, currently over 1 million images have been indexed from peer-review journals in biomedical fields and more is on its way. BioMed Search has been created by Alex Ksikes, currently a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science with focus in Computational Learning Theory at the University of… Continue reading The image of science: Google-like Biomedical Image Search Engine for pros

Valley Brats in Rolling Stone’s Tech Issue: trends in journalism (weekend off)

And now for something completely different! Sometimes life is just simply life for me without any extension. This is Life.exe. So at the weekends during the largely dead webtimes, I’ll blog about other things than stem cells, regenerative medicine, maximum life extension and biotech. This week offstory is a report, which shows the transformation of… Continue reading Valley Brats in Rolling Stone’s Tech Issue: trends in journalism (weekend off)

Kevin Dewalt’s answers: technology professional, lifestyle life extensionist

Kevin Dewalt is an American technology professional, presently working at a VC. Kevin is a strong life extension supporter. We’ve met online at Baris Karadogan’s blog. I specially liked his “happy argument” for maximum life extension on the psychological level, see answer 3. 1. What is the story of your life extension commitment? When I… Continue reading Kevin Dewalt’s answers: technology professional, lifestyle life extensionist

The bioinformatics bet: what can IT folks do for life extension?

Briefly: A lot. As you might have noticed, for me as biotechnologist/life extensionist, the most important reference group is the group of IT people, because of the engineering approach, software-hardware tools, intuition concerning technology and funds. After Reason and Chris, our next answerer is Jim Craig, who published his answers here as a comment first… Continue reading The bioinformatics bet: what can IT folks do for life extension?

First full-time biotech employee at Google BioLabs

Hello everybody, let me introduce myself: I am the first full-time biotechnologist at Google Inc. (well, not really). My job at Google is fascinating: I have to plan and build a comprehensive regenerative database/map of the complete human body which will be the input of the ultimate human regenerative software. It is so, because in… Continue reading First full-time biotech employee at Google BioLabs

MIT Tech Review Editor on biotech’s rising star

Jason Pontin, editor-in-chief and publisher of MIT’s Technology Review Magazine who was speaking last week, at MIT’s Emerging Technologies Conference had the opinion in a discussion, that “It’s probably fair to say there’s more revolutionary innovation occuring in biotech and in the material sciences (nanotech) than there is in IT at the moment.” Link It… Continue reading MIT Tech Review Editor on biotech’s rising star

PayPal founder’s $3.5 million support goes for life extension purposes

From SFGate: “Peter A. Thiel, co-founder and former chief executive officer of the online payments system PayPal, announced Saturday he is pledging $3.5 million “to support scientific research into the alleviation and eventual reversal of the debilities caused by aging.” The grant goes to the Methuselah Foundation a nonprofit volunteer organization founded by Aubrey de… Continue reading PayPal founder’s $3.5 million support goes for life extension purposes