Golden day for 23andMe: Time’s 2008 Invention of the Year

This is a golden day for 23andMe despite all crisis worries: Mountain View, CA (PRWEB) October 30, 2008 — TIME Magazine announced today that the Personal Genome Service™ from 23andMe, Inc. has been named 2008’s Invention of the Year. 23andMe was chosen as the year’s most significant invention for its exceptional work in making personal… Continue reading Golden day for 23andMe: Time’s 2008 Invention of the Year

HealthMap & data fusion: detailed Google Tech Talks intro

The Google Tech Talks channel on YouTube slowly but irresistibly became my private university in current tech trends. Here is a recent talk on the amazing HealthMap by its developers John Brownstein, Clark Freifeld, Mikaela Keller. According to the about page: HealthMap brings together disparate data sources to achieve a unified and comprehensive view of… Continue reading HealthMap & data fusion: detailed Google Tech Talks intro

Even ugly handwriting can fit the informal nature of SciFoo

I had problems with my handwriting since elementary schools, or at least my teachers had continuous problems with it. Even during my university years I was asked sometimes to read out loud my essays, papers to them otherwise risking bad grades. Maybe it’s because I am a hidden right-handed using my left hand for writing… Continue reading Even ugly handwriting can fit the informal nature of SciFoo

Sergey Brin, Gly2019Ser & a real chance against Parkinson disease/aging!

It was already known that amongst the Google top people Sergey Brin is the one who is most interested in pushing biotechnology and the biomedical sciences: in his Stanford years he was interested in biology courses according to The Google Story, he married Anne Wojcicki (who graduted from biology at Yale), Google invested $4.4 million… Continue reading Sergey Brin, Gly2019Ser & a real chance against Parkinson disease/aging!

The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Following Matt Cutts’s tweet I am now writing my blog post using the CrossOver Chromium browser which is a Mac and Linux port of the open source Chromium web browser. Google Chrome (Windows-only so far) is built with open source code from Chromium that means I have now a functional Google Chrome clone under Leopard on… Continue reading The Google Chrome Experience on Mac OS X with CrossOver Chromium!

Life extension people & session at SciFoo 2008, Googleplex!

Last year I was probably the only SciFoo Camper with an explicit life extension commitment. I suggested & held a session which was related a bit to partial immortalization but was rather about the systems biology perspective in general, illustrated with some examples. So throughout the terrific SciFoo Camp 2007 life extension as a conversation… Continue reading Life extension people & session at SciFoo 2008, Googleplex!

Petabyte Age Wiredesque lesson on what science can learn from Google

I argued many times here that biology based biotechnology is the next information technology but in order to do so, biotech should harness good IT patterns and mimic its massive computing practices to handle the enormous amount of constantly accumulating data. Often this trend could be summarized in a simple way: keep your eye on… Continue reading Petabyte Age Wiredesque lesson on what science can learn from Google

The Sergey, Larry, Eric test by Anne & Linda: 23andMe at home

“We really think that we can change Health Care…I want to change it in 5 years…it has to change and that’s we all are about” – says Anne Wojcicki, 23andMe co-founder, in the Google Tech Talk on Googling the Googlers’ DNA: A Demonstration of the 23andMe Personal Genome Service. Also a good presentation by Linda… Continue reading The Sergey, Larry, Eric test by Anne & Linda: 23andMe at home

Sergey Brin goes mobile in 2000 & a Russian lesson

Sergey Brin, Google co-founder is a very interesting man. His story is the number one immigrant success story in the USA today, I dare say. I have 2 Brin videos to show you today: In the first one, Sergey demonstrates mobility in 2000 in 3 ways with his ‘faint accent that is no longer identifiably… Continue reading Sergey Brin goes mobile in 2000 & a Russian lesson

What is the Google Health condition of deanimated, frozen people?

A burning question for real: What is (or how to set up) the Google Health status/condition of deanimated, frozen people, like Dr. Steven P. Rievman: Rievman, 64, who co-founded the Cryonics Society of South Florida in the 1960s, now resides in a deep-freeze capsule at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Scottsdale, awaiting the day… Continue reading What is the Google Health condition of deanimated, frozen people?

Meet Dr. Google Health: Roni Zeiger, right out of Stanford!

Roni F. Zeiger, MD (watch his presentation), Google Health product manager, whose PubMed profile (if he really is the very same person) gives us a very strong reason why he was hired by Google for this job (he joined Google in 2006). The 38-year-old, who still sees patients some evenings and weekends at a nearby… Continue reading Meet Dr. Google Health: Roni Zeiger, right out of Stanford!

Google Factory Tour of Health: watch the pivotal moment!

Here is a little timeline from a liveblogger for the Google Factory Tour of Search (05/19/08) including the official launch presentation of Google Health – time frame 83:35/1:23:35 – 90:45/1:30:45 -, by dr. Roni Zeiger, Google Health product manager who truly believes – & he is probably right – “that the most interesting, innovative services… Continue reading Google Factory Tour of Health: watch the pivotal moment!

Late Google Health: catching up with the past, first!

People expect usually too much from Google even in the sectors, like biotechnology or medicine where Google is not native. For me the recent Google Health – which is basically an embryonic online medical health record system for users with a Gmail Account in the USA – seems to be rather about just catching up… Continue reading Late Google Health: catching up with the past, first!

Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

Just a simple filtering & highlighting & regurgitating for you based on Andy Oram’s post apropos of the opening of a larger Cambridge, Massachusetts Google office : Why open source developers can be more productive, and other tales from a Google open house Along the lines of self-motivated employees, I asked a manager whether most… Continue reading Innovation is still bottom-up in IT, what about biotech?

How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Wow, I guess it’s time for me to move into the stock market business! Here’s the story via David Bradley’s tweet: Julie Kent, Search Engine Journal, April 21st, 2008: Google Wants to Index Genetic Information, Invests in Second DNA Start-Up In 2007, Google made headlines when they invested $4.4 million in 23andMe, a genetic screening… Continue reading How to predict the future via Twitter: Google invests in Navigenics

Larry Page is 35 years old today: long live to live long enough!

I’ve always loved the following scene from LOTR, but I’ve always imagined that they are the words of a man who is in a healthy physiological condition due to a robust life extension technology and not due to a mystical ring: Bilbo: “Today is my one hundred and eleventh birthday!” Hobbits: “Happy birthday!” Bilbo: “Alas,… Continue reading Larry Page is 35 years old today: long live to live long enough!

What is Genentech CEO Art Levinson doing for biotech as a Google board member?

The title question is my million (not billion yet) dollar question for this year. Arthur Levinson is a board member of Google (Apple too) and in his leftover time he is the CEO of the most successful biotech company so far, that’s Genentech. I would be curious to hear about his biotech-related activity as a… Continue reading What is Genentech CEO Art Levinson doing for biotech as a Google board member?

Why was life extension ruled out of the 14 Grand Engineering Challenges?

I emailed some of my life extension supporter friends because I think we have a ‘future’ situation: Healthy life extension is not 1 out of the 14 Grand Engineering Challenges…that can be realistically met, most of them early in this century according to the Committee on Grand Challenges for Engineering with members such as Larry… Continue reading Why was life extension ruled out of the 14 Grand Engineering Challenges?

Working without a personal assistant on the top of the big G…is fun!

I’m on my way to a Friday comprehensive exam from stem cell and mitochondrial biology which gives me no time to immerse into blogging this week. I mostly think of big holes in my knowledge like mitochondria and Ca2+ signalling. That’s why I can only offer soft things like the following quote from a fresh… Continue reading Working without a personal assistant on the top of the big G…is fun!

The Bubble City Experience: a contemporary paranerd classic

When I first wrote about Aaron Swartz’s unfinished nervous nerd novel, Bubble City, I had just been through chapter 1 and 2. But at the Dallas International Airport, waiting for the London connection on December 22 I had no choice but quickly finish the other 9 chapters posted so far under the pressure of the… Continue reading The Bubble City Experience: a contemporary paranerd classic

How to get rid of the Google Eye according to Bubble City: Scroogle and Tor

What’s the best thing to do if Google wants track you down and you are “a geek, the kind of person who searched Google every time a thought passed through his head”. Well, Aaron Swartz‘s nervous nerd novel, Bubble City (I summarize my thoughts on it in the next post) has a geeky algorithm to… Continue reading How to get rid of the Google Eye according to Bubble City: Scroogle and Tor

Google’s knollers and the bloggers: cooperation or competition?

Everybody is comparing Google’s Knol project to Wikipedia intended to be a “repository of knowledge from experts on various topics” (NYT) or “a free, ad-supported publishing system” (Wired), currently a “private, invitation-only knowledge sharing service” (Blogoscoped). But for a biotech blogger like me the first association is to compare Knol to the blogosphere. Just think… Continue reading Google’s knollers and the bloggers: cooperation or competition?

23andMe’s mission: connecting all people on the DNA level or social networking XY.0

In these days, tech companies with MISSIONS are flourishing. I guess you’ve already heard about the company, whose mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. The newly launched, Mountain View based 23andMe seems similar in the mission respect. 23andMe is the first (already successful) and web (or rather… Continue reading 23andMe’s mission: connecting all people on the DNA level or social networking XY.0

Last minute, low budget Halloween costume: Mr. Evil Google

Components from top to bottom: Insulated Test/Jumper Leads wig blue ethernet cable original Google T-shirt (I got mine at the Euro Maker Faire) badge (actually I used my SciFoo badge just inside out, there was a modified Google Search Box on the other side with an “I am feeling Evil” button) components desperately needed, but… Continue reading Last minute, low budget Halloween costume: Mr. Evil Google

Will Nature Network join to the Google Gang to use Open Social?

Google will launch this Thursday a new project, called Open Social, a set of software tools for developers to create applications for multiple social networking sites. The standards are accepted so far by Hi5, Orkut, LinkedIn, Friendster, Ning, Salesforce.com, and Oracle, and not accepted by MySpace and obviously Facebook (the whole project could be interpreted… Continue reading Will Nature Network join to the Google Gang to use Open Social?

Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

Google’s Palimpsest project, once realized (in the near future) has the potential to change the way science is done by accepting gigantic (raw?) data sets from all disciplines and making them open and free (including dark data?). Jon Trowbridge from Google Inc. had a presentation on SciFoo, 2007 at the Googleplex not documented well, but… Continue reading Google’s Palimpsest project: promiscuous distribution of all science data sets

People I missed on SciFoo Camp, 2007: The Google Scholar team

There were around 200 campers at the SciFoo Camp, but there are at least 10 times more who could also be easily invited by the same token. There was only real surprise to me concerning the missing: I’ve never found the Google Scholar team members. Where were the Scholar founders, Anurag Acharya and Alex Verstak,… Continue reading People I missed on SciFoo Camp, 2007: The Google Scholar team

Microfluidics at SciFoo, 2007: packing cells into bubbles

Microfluidics deals with the behavior, precise control and manipulation of microliter and nanoliter volumes of fluids. Manu Prakash, grad student from the M.I.T.’s Center for Bits and Atoms had a 100% presentation on microfluidics at the SciFoo Camp, 2007. The small audience (I remember Jeff Hawkins and Lincoln Stein amongst others) was really amazed by… Continue reading Microfluidics at SciFoo, 2007: packing cells into bubbles

iPhone as a SciFoone: a perfect tourist device except the battery

On my SciFoo California trip I eventually have had enough time to test my iPhone as a tourist device. The following tasks have been regularly done by my iPhone while walking in San Francisco, Palo Alto, Berkeley and at the Googleplex: – extensive Google Maps usage (Google Maps is the poor man’s GPS as I’ve… Continue reading iPhone as a SciFoone: a perfect tourist device except the battery

3minutemadness at SciFoo, 2007

At the opening session at SciFoo at the Googleplex, everybody had to stand up and say 1 intro sentence and 3 words or phrases describing the interests and expertises of the person. pseudonomad caught my intro (the name of the picture: 3minutemadness) with his iPhone: What did I say exactly: don’t remember the intro (a… Continue reading 3minutemadness at SciFoo, 2007

SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

The Google Hacks book from O’Reilly was one out of the free goodies on the SciFoo last weekend. Hack #3 is Visualize Google Results with the TouchGraph Java applet that allows you to visually explore the connections between related websites. Of course I started with the term “scifoo” with the setting of filtering single nodes… Continue reading SciFoo links visualized by TouchGraph Google Browser

SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)

SciFoo is over, and I’ve just arrived back to New Orleans from SF. First of all: a big thanks for the organizers (Chris DiBona, Timo Hannay, Tim O’Reilly, Google, Nature, O’Reilly) and campers, it was really the highest end. Here is a quick SciFoo key terms summary (photos, detailed accounts later): “scientific data” One of… Continue reading SciFoo Camp, 2007: data (Google) publishing (Nature) geeks (O’Reilly)