Aging-centric genetic health database in California: 100k people, ~65yrs, 700k SNPs, telomeres too

Kaiser Permanente alongside with UCSF plans for genetic analyses of an unprecedented 100,000 older Californians, the Technology Review writes in Massive Gene Database Planned in California The effort will make use of existing saliva samples taken from California patients, whose average age is 65. Their DNA will be analyzed for 700,000 genetic variations called single-nucleotide… Continue reading Aging-centric genetic health database in California: 100k people, ~65yrs, 700k SNPs, telomeres too

Visualize 23andMe haplogroup defining SNPs with Mitowheel!

Last Friday 23andMe came up with Haplogroup Tree Mutation Mapper which is the first experimental feature that can be instantly tested by biogeek customers (a large portion of  the company’s customer base) in its freshly launched technology sandbox 23andMe Labs that is much like Google Labs. Haplogroup Tree Mutation Mapper “shows you which particular mutations… Continue reading Visualize 23andMe haplogroup defining SNPs with Mitowheel!

Practical DNA: Hugh Rienhoff’s got a story to tell

After the Nature cover article Hugh Rienhoff and the story of My Daughter’s DNA is now covered by Wired magazine. I wrote about Hugh (a fellow SciFoo Camper) as an example of any future bioDIY effort in The conditions of a mass biotech DIY movement and now the Wired piece gives us more context and details… Continue reading Practical DNA: Hugh Rienhoff’s got a story to tell

Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

Nature’s newest issue has a Quantitative genetics supplement with 3 free access pieces included out which I find this review the most interesting: Reverse engineering the genotype–phenotype map with natural genetic variation by Matthew V. Rockman. There’s a lot information to digest and many patterns to understand in this background field in order to approach… Continue reading Nature Insight: The complex trait of quantitative genetics

Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

The newest Nature issue concentrates on personal genomics and its consequences via many types of articles some of them with free access. I only read 1 piece so far by Erika Check Hayden, who has the exclusive freedom at Nature to always pick the best stories and write on any of them, but being a… Continue reading Nature Personal Genomics Very Special

Golden day for 23andMe: Time’s 2008 Invention of the Year

This is a golden day for 23andMe despite all crisis worries: Mountain View, CA (PRWEB) October 30, 2008 — TIME Magazine announced today that the Personal Genome Service™ from 23andMe, Inc. has been named 2008’s Invention of the Year. 23andMe was chosen as the year’s most significant invention for its exceptional work in making personal… Continue reading Golden day for 23andMe: Time’s 2008 Invention of the Year

Mountain View – Budapest: 20 days to get my 23andMe profile!

I ordered my first commercial genetic profile from 23andMe on the 9th of September online, FedExed my 2 ml saliva from Budapest to 23andMe, Mountain View on the 12th of September. I got the results today. That said within 3 weeks since the birth of the idea I purchased more than 500 000 SNPs of… Continue reading Mountain View – Budapest: 20 days to get my 23andMe profile!

Just ordered my 23andMe kit for $399+shipping!

It was time for me to enter personally into the age of commercialized-personalized genetics/genomics and not just to talk about it! New price, new customers! Here is my suggestion to the sales department of 23andMe! 23andMe Democratizes Personal Genomics With New Analytical Platform

Halcyon Molecular: whole genome sequencing well under $1000?

Halcyon Molecular is a quite ambitious startup,  don’t you think? What we do: Halcyon Molecular is developing an ultra-low-cost DNA sequencing technology. Our single molecule approach does not require PCR amplification and will allow for megabase read lengths with simultaneous determination of methylation pattern. We aim to sequence entire human genomes de novo for well… Continue reading Halcyon Molecular: whole genome sequencing well under $1000?

Innovation stop: “All they’ve done is created an extra billing event for the doctor”

It’s my first real encounter with a situation in which the officials of the state of California are clearly against innovation for financial reasons obvious enough (is enough): Wired Science, Alexis Madrigal, upcoming BioBarCamper: Exclusive: DNA Tester Reveals Cease-and-Desist Letter Wired.com has obtained a copy of the cease-and-desist letter sent to Navigenics by the state… Continue reading Innovation stop: “All they’ve done is created an extra billing event for the doctor”

Future stop: California health officials against personal genetics risk-takers

It’s official: The California Department of Public Health wants practicing physicians (many of them prehistorically, sorry, traditionally trained) to be the patres familias in issues between personal genetic test takers and direct-to-consumer personal genetic testing start-ups while declining the test takers’ right to get familiar with their own genetic makeup and risks by their own.… Continue reading Future stop: California health officials against personal genetics risk-takers

23andWe follows 23andMe: First generation of Consumer-Enabled Research

Consumer-Enabled Research, the second goal of pioneering personalized genetics company 23andMe, reached its first generation with the launch of 23andWe. From BusinessWire: “23andWe marks a new approach to genetics research. By directly involving 23andMe customers in the company’s research projects, the goal is to conduct large-scale studies powered by a web-based community of diverse individuals… Continue reading 23andWe follows 23andMe: First generation of Consumer-Enabled Research

Personal genetics test-takers are future risk-takers

A good introduction in Nature on the risks and advantages of letting people know their genetic risk information via personal genetics services. I do hope that the test-takers will finally become the risk overtakers. Helen Pearson: Genetic testing for everyone Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is a rapidly growing market — the past year has seen the… Continue reading Personal genetics test-takers are future risk-takers

Mitowheel now helps you design PCR primers for mitochondrial DNA!

Gábor Zsurka, scientist and developer made another upgrade on our favorite human mitochondrial DNA visualization tool, MitoWheel: this time allele frequencies at polymorphic positions are included in the sequence bar in the form of a gray bar above or below a nucleotide representing the number of individuals carrying the SNP. This is really cool as… Continue reading Mitowheel now helps you design PCR primers for mitochondrial DNA!

What is Genentech CEO Art Levinson doing for biotech as a Google board member?

The title question is my million (not billion yet) dollar question for this year. Arthur Levinson is a board member of Google (Apple too) and in his leftover time he is the CEO of the most successful biotech company so far, that’s Genentech. I would be curious to hear about his biotech-related activity as a… Continue reading What is Genentech CEO Art Levinson doing for biotech as a Google board member?

Mitowheel upgrade: phylogenetics in motion

Gábor Zsurka has built some killer functions into Mitowheel, the human mitochondrial DNA visualization tool: – compare GenBank‘s circa 3000 fully sequenced human mitochondrial genome to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence mutation by mutation – by harnessing the power of the colorful group view and using the +, – mutation operators (see detailed introduction) you… Continue reading Mitowheel upgrade: phylogenetics in motion

The human mitochondrial consensus genome sequence by Robert Carter

For historical reasons the standard human mitochondrial sequence, the Revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) is a reconstruction of a single European individual’s mtDNA and contains several rare alleles. That’s why many times a usual mtDNA sequence alignment must appeal to phylogenetic historical reconstructions. The rCRS nevertheless provides a uniform nucleotide numbering scheme (0-16569). On the… Continue reading The human mitochondrial consensus genome sequence by Robert Carter

The MitoWheel blog keeps you updated!

MitoWheel is a cool graphical interface of the circular human mitochondrial genome, which helps the user to get familiar with the mito DNA by searching, clicking and tailoring it. I introduced you MitoWheel a week or so ago, but now you can follow the updates on the MitoWheel Blog. On the blog you get first-hand… Continue reading The MitoWheel blog keeps you updated!

The first human genome project: mitochondrial DNA, 16.6kb, 1981, Cambridge

When I had worked on my MSc thesis in biology on the relation of human mitochondrial mutations and aging the paper I used most frequently was Sequence and organization of the human mitochondrial genome by Anderson et al. published in Nature, 1981. The reason was simple: it is more of a database than a hypothesis… Continue reading The first human genome project: mitochondrial DNA, 16.6kb, 1981, Cambridge

23andMe on the biparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA and more

In my former blog post inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa? I meditated on 23andMe‘s capability of detecting paternal mitochondrial DNA in their customers’ saliva with their Illumina microarray chips scanning around 2000 mitochondrial single nucleotide variants. Published here the initial answer of the 23andMe Editorial Team to this fairly… Continue reading 23andMe on the biparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA and more

inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa?

Have you ever asked any important but infrequently asked questions? Have you ever heard about the first personal genome service by the biotech startup 23andMe? Here is an inF.A.Q. addressed to this company: According to the cool 23andMe genetics educator: According to the peer review literature this is not necessarily the case and sometimes (rarely… Continue reading inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa?

23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

“We are all from the same seed” – Kara Swisher summarizes what she heard from Linda Avey, co-founder of web based personal genome service 23andMe in the video interview below. Linda and the other founder Anne Wojcicki just talked about the company’s ancestry, genetic comparison and similarity seeking services, the ones that will technologically turned… Continue reading 23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

Spit a big in a tube, search with Genome Explorer: the 23andMe way

Detailed article in the New York Times on the early experience of decoding the genetic code and interpreting the customers’ DNA via the service of 23andMe. The buzz name of the project: personalized genetics/genomics. Although other companies are mentioned briefly, the focus is clearly on 23andMe. The basics: get rid of a thousand bucks (sorry,… Continue reading Spit a big in a tube, search with Genome Explorer: the 23andMe way

Craig Venter and Tim O’Reilly chat: when 2 worlds meet

Biotech is the next infotech (or at least the 2 worlds need to be merged) and it is good to detect the signs of the growing biotech interest on part of the general tech crowd. At the Web 2.0 summit (organised by and for the Silicon Valley tech-media establishment) Tim O’ Reilly asked Craig Just… Continue reading Craig Venter and Tim O’Reilly chat: when 2 worlds meet

The power links of the mitochondriologist focusing on human mitochondrial genetics

I am hanging around stem cells all the time, while there are as many interesting things happening with mitochondria too. So I asked my former supervisor, Gábor Zsurka excellent mitochondrial geneticist (especially on mitochondrial DNA recombination in human skeletal muscle) to email me his main web sources in the field in order to share. Here… Continue reading The power links of the mitochondriologist focusing on human mitochondrial genetics