Blogxperiment: mitochondrial division, the graphics way

In the blogxperiment series part 1 the question was: What is the best way to summarize peer-review articles for an open web readership and transmit scholarly knowledge and literature? Here is the cartoon way, figure 1. out of the context of The Machines that Divide and Fuse Mitochondria review, written by Suzanne Hoppins, Laura Lackner,… Continue reading Blogxperiment: mitochondrial division, the graphics way

LabAction.com: new player on the science video niche market

Well, I am pleased to announce that we’ve just entered into an era of online scientific video sharing as there exists now a nascent niche market around. After the first mover JoVE (Journal of Visualized Expermients, covered many times here), LabAction.com was launched on 21st March 07 with as many as 3 biology-related videos. And… Continue reading LabAction.com: new player on the science video niche market

Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site

Maxine Clarke, Publishing Executive Editor of Nature and blogger of Peer-to-Peer got interested in the problem of “supporting information” and in the idea of an open access, peer-review supporting information aggregator website. She shared with me her valuable thoughts and informations by mail, from which I now publish parts with the permission of Maxine Clarke… Continue reading Nature Publishing Editor on the idea of a public scientific multimedia site

Terrific cell biology animation (decoded): a trailer now, and a video for all

One of the constant hits of Pimm is the Terrific Pixar-style Harvard animation on molecular biology. The early animation was full of riddles for the non-experts, since it lacked the informative narration, the act of naming, just like we were at the age of silent films. Not anymore! Thanks to alfredoalcalde the full video with… Continue reading Terrific cell biology animation (decoded): a trailer now, and a video for all

Terrific Pixar-style Harvard animation on molecular biology

In my biologically committed childhood I fantasized about a movie which presents all the main actors of the cell machinery: nucleic acids, enzymes, cytoskeleton (see left), ribosomes (mRNA translation into polypeptide chain, see right), hydrophob and hydrophil proteins, lipid membrane bilayers, kinesins and so on. Now BioVisions from Harvard made half my dreams (no intranuclear… Continue reading Terrific Pixar-style Harvard animation on molecular biology