Top 10 PLoS Articles based on online usage

Big news at PLoS: today Mark Patterson announced on the PLoS blog that

“As part of our ongoing article-level metrics program, we’re delighted to announce that all seven PLoS journals will now provide online usage data for published articles”.

I downloaded the entire dataset and as a starter sorted it according to Combined Usage = numbers of HTML page views (the full text version of our articles) + PDF downloads + XML downloads

Here is the Top Ten most viewed PLoS articles according to the newly released article-metrics (read the FAQ too).

PLoSTopTenArticles

17 thoughts on “Top 10 PLoS Articles based on online usage

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