Hourglass, a blog carnival devoted to the biology of aging

Finally Chris over at Ouroboros came up with the idea and the quick implementation of Hourglass, a blog carnival devoted to the biology of aging/biogerontology.  For some reason I am not an explicit supporter of blog carnivals – many of my posts were chosen by carnival editors but I never hosted one -, but Hourglass will be the big exception in which I participate, submit posts and host it later. The reason: first it presents aging/biogerontology related posts, which fits my profile and second it was instigated by Chris Patil, whose work is a guarantee for keeping all this in the good direction. So if you want to read on the evolution of longevity and aging, calorie restricition, stem cells/tissue engineering/regenerative medicine, or on the association of long life and intelligence at once, Hourglass is for you.

4 thoughts on “Hourglass, a blog carnival devoted to the biology of aging

  1. Soft-updates guarantees that the only filesystem inconsistencies on unclean shutdown are leaked blocks and inodes. To resolve this you can run a background fsck or you can ignore it until you start to run out of space. We also could’ve written a mark and sweep garbage collector but never did. Ultimately, the bgfsck is too expensive and people did not like the uncertainty of not having run fsck. To resolve these issues, I have added a small journal to softupdates. However, I only have to journal block allocation and free, and inode link count changes since softdep guarantees the rest. My journal records are each only 32bytes which is incredibly compact compared to any other journaling solution. We still get the great concurrency and ability to ignore writes which have been canceled by new operations. But now we have recovery time that is around 2 seconds per megabyte of journal in-use. That’s 32,768 blocks allocated, files created, links added, etc. per megabyte of journal.

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