The Bubble City Experience: a contemporary paranerd classic

When I first wrote about Aaron Swartz’s unfinished nervous nerd novel, Bubble City, I had just been through chapter 1 and 2. But at the Dallas International Airport, waiting for the London connection on December 22 I had no choice but quickly finish the other 9 chapters posted so far under the pressure of the… Continue reading The Bubble City Experience: a contemporary paranerd classic

How to get rid of the Google Eye according to Bubble City: Scroogle and Tor

What’s the best thing to do if Google wants track you down and you are “a geek, the kind of person who searched Google every time a thought passed through his head”. Well, Aaron Swartz‘s nervous nerd novel, Bubble City (I summarize my thoughts on it in the next post) has a geeky algorithm to… Continue reading How to get rid of the Google Eye according to Bubble City: Scroogle and Tor

Matt Thurling on the concept of science.TV

Another comment turns to blog post to make it more visible: Following my post on science.TV, Matt Thurling, founder explained the concept of it in a lengthy comment, that sheds light on the ins and outs of science.TV (emphasis added by me): Although science.tv has been some three years in the making, we’re still in… Continue reading Matt Thurling on the concept of science.TV

science.TV joins the club but exactly which?

science.TV is one amongst the newest actors of the online video sharing marketplace, based in Bristol, UK. As Matt Thurling, founder says: “My vision for science.tv is simply to provide the best possible set of tools to enable interaction via video between the science community. My definition of the science community is probably broader than… Continue reading science.TV joins the club but exactly which?

My transatlantic air reading: Bubble City, a blog novel by Aaron Swartz

At least I know what I will read on the plane over at the Atlantic tomorrow back to old Europe: Bubble City by Aaron Swartz. What by who? Bubble city is a blog tech novel with chapters as posts. The story takes place in San Francisco and in Silicon Valley around a startup called Newsflip… Continue reading My transatlantic air reading: Bubble City, a blog novel by Aaron Swartz

Dan 1 minute of Fake Jobs Lyons wants to donate an XO laptop to get one

The web is small and the Linux freak, Forbes-driven Fake Steve Jobs would like to participate in the “Give One Get One” program in which people can donate an XO laptop to a child in the developing world and receive one. I guess that’s the reason why he published our XO unwrapping video on his… Continue reading Dan 1 minute of Fake Jobs Lyons wants to donate an XO laptop to get one

Everything you want to know about Make:TV on Videovoo

I am not watching to many videocasts, but the last 5 epizodes of the Make Weekend Projects with Bre Pettis are always on my iPhone and viewed every time. Now Anna over at Videovoo reports on the coming Make:TV featuring half-hour episodes that will be presented in High-Def TV and streamed on the web in… Continue reading Everything you want to know about Make:TV on Videovoo

We have only winners at the Laboratory Website Awards!

I hope that scientists and IT and financial managers of scientists worldwide will be able to utilize the collective lab website culture and wisdom accumulated by the first ever Laboratory Web Site Awards by The Scientist! And I personally would like to say thank you for the following editors of The Scientist (The Scientists) for… Continue reading We have only winners at the Laboratory Website Awards!

Boo, our XO laptop shipped to our home and its twin to a child somewhere

In November we participated in the “Give One Get One” program in which people can donate an XO laptop to a child in the developing world and receive one. Yesterday we got ours, named Boo and Anna recorded the first moments of Boo at our home and published it on her blog Videovoo with detailed… Continue reading Boo, our XO laptop shipped to our home and its twin to a child somewhere

The first human genome project: mitochondrial DNA, 16.6kb, 1981, Cambridge

When I had worked on my MSc thesis in biology on the relation of human mitochondrial mutations and aging the paper I used most frequently was Sequence and organization of the human mitochondrial genome by Anderson et al. published in Nature, 1981. The reason was simple: it is more of a database than a hypothesis… Continue reading The first human genome project: mitochondrial DNA, 16.6kb, 1981, Cambridge

Hungarian “Crocodile Hunter” dies in a rattlesnake driven motorcycle accident

New Orleans, Louisiana is a home of many weird people full with bizarre stories. One of them was Sandor Szalmas a Katrina survivor, jack-of all trades DIY Hungarian, who lived in the town since 1981. When I first heard the story of his fatal Dec. 5. motorcycle accident last week, he was in a coma… Continue reading Hungarian “Crocodile Hunter” dies in a rattlesnake driven motorcycle accident

Google’s knollers and the bloggers: cooperation or competition?

Everybody is comparing Google’s Knol project to Wikipedia intended to be a “repository of knowledge from experts on various topics” (NYT) or “a free, ad-supported publishing system” (Wired), currently a “private, invitation-only knowledge sharing service” (Blogoscoped). But for a biotech blogger like me the first association is to compare Knol to the blogosphere. Just think… Continue reading Google’s knollers and the bloggers: cooperation or competition?

Do we lose neurons or neuronal stem cells every time we blow our nose?

I guess I will submit this question to the Ask the Experts section of Scientific American. It was a witty remark by a senior scientist at a presentation on neural stem cells and aging last week, here at Tulane. I laughed so much that I had to blow my nose disproving that good jokes keep… Continue reading Do we lose neurons or neuronal stem cells every time we blow our nose?

Biogeekipedia: collecting raw materials

Wired’s Geekipedia is marketed as “People, places, ideas and trends you need to know now“. As such you can find biology and biotech related terms in it (part of the current hip and tech-savvy culture) like ‘stem cells‘, ‘RNAi‘ or ‘brain implants‘, explained. But you won’t find the terms ‘Natureplex’, ‘executable cell biology’, ‘Open Notebook… Continue reading Biogeekipedia: collecting raw materials

23andMe on the biparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA and more

In my former blog post inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa? I meditated on 23andMe‘s capability of detecting paternal mitochondrial DNA in their customers’ saliva with their Illumina microarray chips scanning around 2000 mitochondrial single nucleotide variants. Published here the initial answer of the 23andMe Editorial Team to this fairly… Continue reading 23andMe on the biparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA and more

The received view in 3.5 paragraphs on Ending Aging in Nature (part 1)

In the 15 November Nature issue Judy Illes neurology professor turned neuroethics expert reviews Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People by John Harris and Ending Aging: The Rejuvenation Breakthroughs That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetime by Aubrey de Grey & Michael Rae. From the review: “Ending Aging is a more… Continue reading The received view in 3.5 paragraphs on Ending Aging in Nature (part 1)

California embryonic stem cell dollars: beyond the embryonic phase

According to the newest Request For Applications (RFA) of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the New Cell Line Awards will support two categories of research: Category 1: Derivation of new hESC lines using excess or rejected early stage human embryos generated by in vitro fertilization. Category 2: Derivation of pluripotent human stem cell… Continue reading California embryonic stem cell dollars: beyond the embryonic phase

Bureaucrats and the overuse of the passive voice in science writing

I’ve found the following fine paragraph in the Autumn edition of Nurture, the magazine for past and present Nature journal authors. Linda Cooper writes on “How to make research accessible”: Take the overuse of the passive voice. Scientists tend to think that the passive voice creates an objective tone. But when they rely too heavily… Continue reading Bureaucrats and the overuse of the passive voice in science writing

CNN, USA Today and the terraniche media on niche science video sites

What do you think about the distinction of mainstream – niche on the web? Isn’t it the case that ‘mainstream media’ is just a niche after all, and not necessarily the most important? We have a very nice case study now on how ideas, memes, actions, movements in the science/tech arena are spreading throughout the… Continue reading CNN, USA Today and the terraniche media on niche science video sites