The Regeneration Station – a biotech blog by Aastrom’s Jon Rowley

Jon Rowley is a senior manager at Aastrom Biosciences with a long experience in the not too old Regenerative Medicine field. I am pleased to introduce here his new blog The Regeneration Station as one of the first biotech – regmed blog written by an industrial expert who will share with us his insights on… Continue reading The Regeneration Station – a biotech blog by Aastrom’s Jon Rowley

Unofficial and hypercritical peer review of a paper on p53’s role in hESC regulation

Once I wrote shortly about the following peer review paper which was popped out of my PubMed feeds to draw some attention to it: Han Qin, Tianxin Yu, Tingting Qing, Yanxia Liu, Yang Zhao, Jun Cai, Jian Li, Zhihua Song, Xiuxia Qu, Peng Zhou, Jiong Wu, Mingxiao Ding, Hongkui Deng Regulation of apoptosis and differentiation… Continue reading Unofficial and hypercritical peer review of a paper on p53’s role in hESC regulation

Let’s vote now for the 10 Finalist Lab Websites at The Scientist!

Ladies and gentlemen of science! You can now rank the 10 finalist websites from 1 to 10 (1 being the best) at the Laboratory Website and Video Awards hosted by The Scientist. Please do not hesitate, judging is a lot of fun and this is a big issue: figuring out the parameters of the labsite… Continue reading Let’s vote now for the 10 Finalist Lab Websites at The Scientist!

inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa?

Have you ever asked any important but infrequently asked questions? Have you ever heard about the first personal genome service by the biotech startup 23andMe? Here is an inF.A.Q. addressed to this company: According to the cool 23andMe genetics educator: According to the peer review literature this is not necessarily the case and sometimes (rarely… Continue reading inF.A.Q. for 23andMe: what if I have mitochondrial DNA from Pa?

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

I have to interrupt my 23andMe streaming cause there are more interesting things are goin’ on. Chris Patil of Ouroboros has already been a blogterviewee (Part 1, 2, 3) on Pimm. He then shared his detailed views on aging and life extension technologies, but I always wanted to ask Chris about his approach on blogging… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Chris Patil?

Pan-galactic experience: the 23andMe “official launch” webcast

Wow, what an all web experience it was: Linda Avey and Anne Wojcicki co-founders presenting their slides on the just launched personal genome service of their company 23andMe, then answering questions. The whole webcast will be available later on their website. Here is a very short account of their webcast based on my texting and… Continue reading Pan-galactic experience: the 23andMe “official launch” webcast

Web entrepreneurs and biotech: strangers from distant lands

Elrond: Strangers from distant lands, friends of old you have been summoned here to answer the threat of Mordor. Middle Earth stands upon the brink of destruction, none can escape it. You will unite or you will fall. Each race is bound to this fate, this one doom. Bring forth the ring, Frodo. [Frodo puts… Continue reading Web entrepreneurs and biotech: strangers from distant lands

23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

“We are all from the same seed” – Kara Swisher summarizes what she heard from Linda Avey, co-founder of web based personal genome service 23andMe in the video interview below. Linda and the other founder Anne Wojcicki just talked about the company’s ancestry, genetic comparison and similarity seeking services, the ones that will technologically turned… Continue reading 23andMe: Genetics brings people together, rather than differentiate

23andMe’s mission: connecting all people on the DNA level or social networking XY.0

In these days, tech companies with MISSIONS are flourishing. I guess you’ve already heard about the company, whose mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. The newly launched, Mountain View based 23andMe seems similar in the mission respect. 23andMe is the first (already successful) and web (or rather… Continue reading 23andMe’s mission: connecting all people on the DNA level or social networking XY.0

The new faces of Silicon Valley: biotech-savvy co-founders Avey-Wojcicki

After Jobs-Wozniak, Yang-Filo, Brin-Page, it’s time to memorize the names of the co-founders of 23andMe, the first personalized genome service, who are turning the tech establishment into a biotech mode. The new faces of Silicon Valley: the age of Blue Jeans/Black T-Shirt co-founder computer nerds is over, welcome to the era of stylish, well-dressed genetics-savvy… Continue reading The new faces of Silicon Valley: biotech-savvy co-founders Avey-Wojcicki

The life extension bonus effect of personal genome services: +10 years?

After all, what customers can really expect of personal genome services that companies like 23andMe can offer beyond knowing whether they have a perfect pitch or not? If the service can really help in minimizing the risk of life threatening diseases, than the real expectation is to live longer by using those personalized/commercialized genome data.… Continue reading The life extension bonus effect of personal genome services: +10 years?

Spit a big in a tube, search with Genome Explorer: the 23andMe way

Detailed article in the New York Times on the early experience of decoding the genetic code and interpreting the customers’ DNA via the service of 23andMe. The buzz name of the project: personalized genetics/genomics. Although other companies are mentioned briefly, the focus is clearly on 23andMe. The basics: get rid of a thousand bucks (sorry,… Continue reading Spit a big in a tube, search with Genome Explorer: the 23andMe way

Tit in the webcam and lifecasting for animals

A lifecasting and human free video streaming channel for animals could easily be a lot more interesting than Justin.tv. An early video tracking system based on miniaturized, animal-borne video cameras was developed for studying the undisturbed behavior (capturing lizards, using tools, flying) of new Caledonian crows and published in Science. Of course the online supporting… Continue reading Tit in the webcam and lifecasting for animals

Is it by accident that both Google first ladies are biologists?

Or is it the strongest personal indication of the future of technology? No, it’s not my job to answer this question, but I could be optimistic about the consequences of it. By now the story of Anne Wojcicki, Sergey Brin and 23andMe is a commonplace in the blogosphere. While Anne is graduated with a BS… Continue reading Is it by accident that both Google first ladies are biologists?

Interdisciplinarity explained: “Eclectic others, who are smart and fun to have around”

I’ve found the following perfect quote in Paul Smaglik’s NatureJobs report on the current human brain mapping efforts of scientists all around the world (emphasis by me): Interdisciplinary groups are trying to combine imaging approaches and analyse them with statistics, and computational and mathematical modelling. Nikos Logothetis, a professor in physiology and cognitive processes at… Continue reading Interdisciplinarity explained: “Eclectic others, who are smart and fun to have around”

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

I met Maxine online first when she commented my post on the The problem of online “supporting information” in peer-review articles and then interviewed her on Nature policies concerning the same problem. Then I met Maxine offline in London and learnt a lot on how every issue of Nature is born and other insights I… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Maxine Clarke?

“Give One Get One” starts today at the One Laptop per Child project!

I’ve just ordered 2 more laptops, although we already have 3, why? Because starting today you (in the U.S. or Canada) can donate an XO laptop to a child in the developing world and receive one for $399+24.95 for shipping. And Anna, the better half of my family in New Orleans, alarmed and convinced me… Continue reading “Give One Get One” starts today at the One Laptop per Child project!

The birthplace of America’s first superhero: downtown Budapest

It’s weekend which means I am not just about biology and biotech blogging and can allocate a little time to spend on other projects like visiting the nearest Barnes & Noble at Metairie (it is a shame that there are no big bookstores in Uptown New Orleans except the Tulane Campus) and buying new books… Continue reading The birthplace of America’s first superhero: downtown Budapest

What is your (science) blogging writing style, Deepak Singh?

Actually the idea of asking science bloggers about their style came to my mind reading one email remark of Deepak on the writing style. Deepak is the guy behind business/byte/genes/molecules and he was a Sci Foo camper this year. He is one amongst the few bloggers who are standing at the intersection of science and… Continue reading What is your (science) blogging writing style, Deepak Singh?

It’s now judging time at The Laboratory Website Awards…

and I really like it. The nominations for the best laboratory websites are now closed at the Laboratory Website and Video Awards hosted by The Scientist. Now it’s the job of the judging panel (and I am one of them) to make our scores and review the nominees and then turn the voting back to… Continue reading It’s now judging time at The Laboratory Website Awards…

Collect and FedEx menstrual stem cells with the C’elle kit: the next flow

It is a somewhat very positive idea that human tissues previously considered as waste products (after filling their essential role in the human body) like the placenta and the umbilical cord are radically reinterpreted as valuable sources of prospective therapies due to the current results of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. Exactly this reinterpretation… Continue reading Collect and FedEx menstrual stem cells with the C’elle kit: the next flow

Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Alien vs. Predator like stupid question for the weekend: Which do you think is the best source when it is about interesting and quality science content: the Techmeme clone Blogrunner (here it’s the science channel of Blogrunner), that is the newly launched automated online news service and blogs aggregator by the New York Times or… Continue reading Blogrunner Science vs. Scienceblogs vs. Postgenomic?

Watch science videos on the iPhone with vTap beyond YouTube!

So far science videos on the iPhone were restricted to YouTube and subscribed, previously downloaded science-related vlogs on iTunes due to the lack of Flash, Windows Media Player, etc. support. But now with a new web app called vTap a bigger range of (science) videos are available and can now be played in the iPhone’s… Continue reading Watch science videos on the iPhone with vTap beyond YouTube!

Last minute, low budget Halloween costume: Mr. Evil Google

Components from top to bottom: Insulated Test/Jumper Leads wig blue ethernet cable original Google T-shirt (I got mine at the Euro Maker Faire) badge (actually I used my SciFoo badge just inside out, there was a modified Google Search Box on the other side with an “I am feeling Evil” button) components desperately needed, but… Continue reading Last minute, low budget Halloween costume: Mr. Evil Google

Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things

As a biotech geek blogger and occasionally Make contributor, who stands at the intersection of science and technology with a (life) science bias, it is more and more exciting to see how the attractive brands of the 2 sides are building the bridge and creating a shared channel. So far, the biggest manifestation of this… Continue reading Tim O’ Reilly at Nature: science meets bored tech-savvyness to find new things