Links from my reader/radar: Googlized Science Direct, Foo Camp, G Scholar as impact-o-meter

Science Direct-ly into Google by Peter Brantley, O’Reilly Radar: Elsevier has now undertaken to have the majority of its SD journals (those for which it holds or can obtain the copyrights) crawled and indexed by Google. Both Google and Google Scholar are slowly incorporating an increasing amount of this content, and these data will be appearing in search results for Google and Google Scholar.

Foo Camp Takeaways by Tim O’ Reilly, O’Reilly Radar: We held our annual Foo Camp in Sebastopol this past weekend. Foo Camp is a weekend geek campout that’s been described as “the wiki of conferences,” because there’s no program beforehand. The program is developed on the spot on Friday night by people swarming a set of big whiteboards with rooms and time blocks. (This year, courtesy of Rabble’s “foocal”, we also got an online version.) We hold Foo Camp for a number of reasons: 1. To learn about what’s next. 2. To test out new product ideas, and to find new authors, conference presenters, and possible investments. 3. To spark other people. 4. To meet new people, and to introduce our friends to each other. We meet new people, and we are always saying to each other “You’ve got to meet…” Sharing friends is one of the most satisfying kinds of sharing.

Google scholar as a measure of impact by Maxine Clarke, Nautilus: Antonio G. Valdecasas and Uta Grothkopf write: Maybe the days of the SCI are numbered, as is already the case in disciplines such as astronomy, where alternative services are used. If impact is to be used as a metric that affects people directly, then databases like Google Scholar — free, accessible to everybody, and non-discriminatory against languages other than English — could provide a tool of universal coverage for bureaucrats and evaluation committees to discover the real impact of publications and hence to be less biased in the distribution of benefits.

55 Essential Articles Every Serious Blogger Should Read by Matt Huggins via Lifehacker