Everything Technorati knows about life extension

As you might know Technorati, the premiere blog search engine was redesigned about a week ago, and now it is intended to be a more universal search engine which is mirrored in the current subtitle on the page: “Zillions of photos, videos, blogs and more.” Here is what you can find after typing the term… Continue reading Everything Technorati knows about life extension

Informational emergency in the operating room: does it count as a right?

I found this exciting case in the book (yes, I am still reading those) of Lancet editor-in-chief Richard Horton called: Second Opinion: Doctors, Diseases and Decisions in Modern Medicine “Surgery is all about action, not reflection. But information is sometimes critical, even in the operating room. In 2002, surgeons in Australia were working frantically to… Continue reading Informational emergency in the operating room: does it count as a right?

Jobs/Gates on the history, Jobs/other guys on the future of digital revolution

News: “Both Jobs and Gates are slated to jointly discuss the digital revolution’s history and future at The Wall Street Journal’s D: All Things Digital conference on Wednesday.” Comment: Instead of Mr. Gates I’d be eager to see those 2 guys on the right discussing the future of all things digital (especially the future of… Continue reading Jobs/Gates on the history, Jobs/other guys on the future of digital revolution

Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

In the age of compelling technology analogies and nomenclatures it was unavoidable that somebody at last identifies enough differences in the history of industrial regenerative medicine to tell Regenerative Medicine 1.0 from 2.0. The man behind is Chris Mason, Group Leader of Stem Cell + Regenerative Medicine Bioprocessing Unit, University College London and cofounder and… Continue reading Are we really in the age of Regenerative Medicine 2.0? A comparison by Chris Mason

Anthony Atala on regenerative medicine at New Yorker’s 2012 conference

Dr. Anthony Atala of pluripotent amniotic fluid-derived stem cell and tissue engineered bladder fame gave a presentation on Regenerative Medicine at the 2007 New Yorker Conference “2012: Stories from the Near Future”. Atala, the director of the Biopolis-like huge Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine with circa 150 people, talks amongst others on the differences… Continue reading Anthony Atala on regenerative medicine at New Yorker’s 2012 conference

Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

I’ve just realized how cool is Cell magazine May 4 issue’s cover (the one with the Scientist Enter the Blogosphere report by Laura Bonetta) with the S-nitrosothiol superhero T-shirt. This substance may have some therapeutic utility in diseases such as heart failure and asthma. Illustration: Cell and me this morning. Cartoons are terrific education tools,… Continue reading Cell’s Superhero Cover: the role of comics in science popularization

Bone marrow stem cells, the great cancer pretenders?

In the lack of subscription to Stem Cells, I could not download the whole article or the subscription restricted supplemental data (at Stem Cells it seems people haven’t heard of free supplemental information) but this story is really interesting: Bone Marrow Contributes to Epithelial Cancers in Mice and Humans as Developmental Mimicry In brief: in… Continue reading Bone marrow stem cells, the great cancer pretenders?

Google as your daily lab organizer or The Google Scientist Gamma

From the Financial Times: Google’s ambition to maximise the personal information it holds on users is so great that the search engine envisages a day when it can tell people what jobs to take and how they might spend their days off. Google CEO Eric Schmidt said: “The goal is to enable Google users to… Continue reading Google as your daily lab organizer or The Google Scientist Gamma

The power links of the mitochondriologist focusing on human mitochondrial genetics

I am hanging around stem cells all the time, while there are as many interesting things happening with mitochondria too. So I asked my former supervisor, Gábor Zsurka excellent mitochondrial geneticist (especially on mitochondrial DNA recombination in human skeletal muscle) to email me his main web sources in the field in order to share. Here… Continue reading The power links of the mitochondriologist focusing on human mitochondrial genetics

Weekly Recap

It was an important week for Pimm, few posts hopefully with a longer turnover, not a bunch of posts with a minute fame for short-term memory. Stem Cell Lab Monitor: the Bernstein Laboratory at UCSF Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows Stem Cell Lab Monitor: post series on excellent stem… Continue reading Weekly Recap

Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Builders, Hackers, Do-It-Yourselfers are gathering around this weekend at the most visible embodiment of the Maker spirit, the Maker Faire 2007 at San Mateo Fairgrounds, California. I remember the inquisitive and incredulous eyes of the traditional tech makers, coders, engineers while presenting my placental stem cell project at Euro Maker Faire last year. Now imagine… Continue reading Second Annual Maker Faire this weekend and expecting the First BioMaker Faire…

Stem Cell Lab Monitor: the Bernstein Laboratory at UCSF

The first lab of Pimm’s new series turned out to be the Bernstein Laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco focusing on heart muscle regeneration. Unlike other professors, Harold Bernstein is extra fast, he answered my questions within 8 hours. This web-availability, rare within academic circles, positively correlates with the design and functionality of… Continue reading Stem Cell Lab Monitor: the Bernstein Laboratory at UCSF

Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Paul Smaglik, Naturejobs editor wrote a Prospects piece in the current Nature (yeah, the big one) in his column on laboratory website culture apropos of the highly unofficial lab website competition of Pimm. Read it, think it over and build better and more professional lab websites. Oh yes, and don’t forget to allocate the resources… Continue reading Laboratory website culture and Pimm in Nature: the real digital windows

Stem Cell Lab Monitor: post series on excellent stem cell labs

Research in life sciences is more a team effort than ever. If you take a look on an average peer review article, in most cases there are as many as 6 authors and usually from more than 1 lab. But the basic unit and currency of any valuable research contribution is a LAB. Not the… Continue reading Stem Cell Lab Monitor: post series on excellent stem cell labs

Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists

If you are busy building a professional career and want things to get done, it’s time to forget MySpace, Facebook or any other social networking 1.0 sites, that are focusing on friendship, love, spam whatever with a general membership. What you need is social networking 2.0, which is based on the special profession you’re in,… Continue reading Nature Network Global Beta and social networking 2.0 for scientists

Opinionated Stem Cells for Dummies, Right to Recover

Right to Recover is a new book written by Yvonne Perry freelance journalist with the subtitle: Winning the Political and Religious Wars over Stem Cell Research in America. Anyone read it yet? Blog of the book: Right to Recover Content of the book: Book Contents for Right to Recover FOREWORD (in this case I guess… Continue reading Opinionated Stem Cells for Dummies, Right to Recover

Stem Cell Cup: California Embryonics vs Massachusetts Oldies: $3 vs $1.25 Billion

While people in California can think they are in the centre of the (embryonic) stem cell universe due to Proposition 71’s $3 Billion and the invasion of good scientists into the West Coast, Massachusetts academic and biotech people also are thinking along those lines, so state officials quickly set up a $1.25 Billion package for… Continue reading Stem Cell Cup: California Embryonics vs Massachusetts Oldies: $3 vs $1.25 Billion

2 models of embryonic and adult blood formation: Figure by Ueno and Weissman

If you have previously thought (in your spare time) that the conventional wisdom concerning blood formation is that the yolk sac’s embryonic blood-forming cells serve only the embryo, while the source of adult blood-forming stem cells is the region called aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM), it’s time to think it again due the elegant experiments of Samokhalov et… Continue reading 2 models of embryonic and adult blood formation: Figure by Ueno and Weissman

Content of Ending Aging, Aubrey de Grey’s coming life extension book

You can now pre-order Ending Aging: The Rejuvenation Biotechnologies That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetime at Amazon written by Aubrey de Grey and Michael Rae which is the most detailed, although popular exposition of the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) plan to defeat aging. Aubrey was kind enough to mail me the… Continue reading Content of Ending Aging, Aubrey de Grey’s coming life extension book

Recharging your laptop with broadcasting power through the air

That’s what the geeky population of the world is waiting for a long time: Powercast‘s dime-size receiver embedded in any low voltage device can turn radio waves into DC voltage coming from a transmitter in a wall. The soul of the product is John Shearer’s invention. “He figured much of the energy bouncing off walls… Continue reading Recharging your laptop with broadcasting power through the air

Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

These two titles are freshly out of my feed readers: B-type natriuretic peptide inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol transfer and steroidogenesis in primary human adrenocortical cells. and In vivo expression of human ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR) using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) serotypes 2 and 8. How user friendly these titles are? Let’s examine me: Theoretically… Continue reading Looking for user friendly, attractive peer review article titles….

Bell curve in medical care: Atul Gawande in Author@Google

The Anna of my life mailed me the link of The Authors@Google program, which “brings authors of all stripes to Google for informal talks centering on their recently published books.” You can browse the Google Talks videos with one click. And non other than Atul Gawande, author of New Yorker’s opinionated The Way We Age… Continue reading Bell curve in medical care: Atul Gawande in Author@Google

Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory

Maxine Clarke, Nature’s blogactive and web-oriented Publishing Executive Editor blogged on has an interesting and opinionated editorial on Share your lab notes in Nature 447, 1-2 (3 May 2007). also available at Nautilus. Her The line of argument is: The use of electronic laboratory notebooks should be supported by all concerned since they “contain data… Continue reading Towards Universal Online Laboratory Notebooks – in theory